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Alcohol use and friendship dynamics: selection and socialization in early-, middle-, and late-adolescent peer networks.
J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2012 Jan; 73(1):89-98.JS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study examined developmental trends of peer selection and socialization related to friends' alcohol use in early-, middle-, and late-adolescent peer networks, with the primary goal of identifying when these mechanisms emerge, when these mechanisms exert their strongest effects, and when (or if) they decrease in importance. Gender and reciprocity are also tested as moderators of selection and socialization.

METHOD

Cross-sequential study (three age cohorts assessed at three annual measurements) of 950 youth (53% male) initially attending classrooms in Grade 4 (n = 314; M = 10.1 years), Grade 7 (n = 335; M = 13.1 years), and Grade 10 (n = 301; M = 16.2 years).

RESULTS

Similarity between friends' drinking behaviors emerged in Grade 6, peaked in Grade 8, and decreased throughout late adolescence. Adolescents in all three age groups selected peers with similar drinking behaviors, with effects being more robust for early-adolescent males and for late-adolescent females. Peers' alcohol use emerged as a significant predictor of middle-adolescent alcohol use and remained a significant predictor of individual drinking behaviors throughout late adolescence. Socialization did not differ as a function of gender or reciprocity.

CONCLUSIONS

Alcohol-related peer selection was relatively more important than socialization in early-adolescent friendship networks; both mechanisms contributed to explaining similarity between the drinking behaviors of friends in middle and late adolescence. Effects of peer socialization emerged in middle adolescence and remained throughout late adolescence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. w.burk@psych.ru.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22152666

Citation

Burk, William J., et al. "Alcohol Use and Friendship Dynamics: Selection and Socialization in Early-, Middle-, and Late-adolescent Peer Networks." Journal of Studies On Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 73, no. 1, 2012, pp. 89-98.
Burk WJ, van der Vorst H, Kerr M, et al. Alcohol use and friendship dynamics: selection and socialization in early-, middle-, and late-adolescent peer networks. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2012;73(1):89-98.
Burk, W. J., van der Vorst, H., Kerr, M., & Stattin, H. (2012). Alcohol use and friendship dynamics: selection and socialization in early-, middle-, and late-adolescent peer networks. Journal of Studies On Alcohol and Drugs, 73(1), 89-98.
Burk WJ, et al. Alcohol Use and Friendship Dynamics: Selection and Socialization in Early-, Middle-, and Late-adolescent Peer Networks. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2012;73(1):89-98. PubMed PMID: 22152666.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol use and friendship dynamics: selection and socialization in early-, middle-, and late-adolescent peer networks. AU - Burk,William J, AU - van der Vorst,Haske, AU - Kerr,Margaret, AU - Stattin,Håkan, PY - 2011/12/14/entrez PY - 2011/12/14/pubmed PY - 2012/6/13/medline SP - 89 EP - 98 JF - Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs JO - J Stud Alcohol Drugs VL - 73 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study examined developmental trends of peer selection and socialization related to friends' alcohol use in early-, middle-, and late-adolescent peer networks, with the primary goal of identifying when these mechanisms emerge, when these mechanisms exert their strongest effects, and when (or if) they decrease in importance. Gender and reciprocity are also tested as moderators of selection and socialization. METHOD: Cross-sequential study (three age cohorts assessed at three annual measurements) of 950 youth (53% male) initially attending classrooms in Grade 4 (n = 314; M = 10.1 years), Grade 7 (n = 335; M = 13.1 years), and Grade 10 (n = 301; M = 16.2 years). RESULTS: Similarity between friends' drinking behaviors emerged in Grade 6, peaked in Grade 8, and decreased throughout late adolescence. Adolescents in all three age groups selected peers with similar drinking behaviors, with effects being more robust for early-adolescent males and for late-adolescent females. Peers' alcohol use emerged as a significant predictor of middle-adolescent alcohol use and remained a significant predictor of individual drinking behaviors throughout late adolescence. Socialization did not differ as a function of gender or reciprocity. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol-related peer selection was relatively more important than socialization in early-adolescent friendship networks; both mechanisms contributed to explaining similarity between the drinking behaviors of friends in middle and late adolescence. Effects of peer socialization emerged in middle adolescence and remained throughout late adolescence. SN - 1938-4114 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22152666/Alcohol_use_and_friendship_dynamics:_selection_and_socialization_in_early__middle__and_late_adolescent_peer_networks_ L2 - https://www.jsad.com/doi/abs/10.15288/jsad.2012.73.89 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -