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[The optimal duration of anticoagulant treatment following pulmonary embolism].
Rev Mal Respir. 2011 Dec; 28(10):1265-77.RM

Abstract

The optimal course of oral anticoagulant therapy is determined according to the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism after stopping therapy and the risk of anticoagulant-related bleeding. Clinical risk factors appear to be important in predicting the risk of recurrence whereas the influence of biochemical and morphological tests is uncertain. The risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism is low when the initial episode was provoked by a reversible major risk factor (surgery): 3 months of anticoagulation is sufficient. Conversely, the risk is high when venous thromboembolism was unprovoked or associated with persistent risk factor (cancer): 6 months or more prolonged anticoagulation is necessary. After this first estimation, the duration of anticoagulation may be modulated according to the presence or absence of certain additional risk factors (major thrombophilia, chronic pulmonary hypertension, massive pulmonary embolism): 6 months if pulmonary embolism was provoked and 12 to 24 months if pulmonary embolism was unprovoked. If the risk of anticoagulant-related bleeding is high, the duration of anticoagulation should be shortened (3 months if pulmonary embolism was provoked and 3 to 6 months if it was unprovoked). Lastly, if pulmonary embolism occurred in association with cancer, anticoagulation should be conducted for 6 months or more if the cancer is active or treatment is on going. Despite an increasing knowledge of the risk factors for recurrent venous thromboembolism, a number of issues remain unresolved. Randomised trials comparing different durations of anticoagulation are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

EA 3878 (Getbo), IFR 148, CIC INSERM 0502, département de médecine interne et pneumologie, CHU La Cavale Blanche, Brest cedex, France. francis.couturaud@chu-brest.fr

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

fre

PubMed ID

22152935

Citation

Couturaud, F. "[The Optimal Duration of Anticoagulant Treatment Following Pulmonary Embolism]." Revue Des Maladies Respiratoires, vol. 28, no. 10, 2011, pp. 1265-77.
Couturaud F. [The optimal duration of anticoagulant treatment following pulmonary embolism]. Rev Mal Respir. 2011;28(10):1265-77.
Couturaud, F. (2011). [The optimal duration of anticoagulant treatment following pulmonary embolism]. Revue Des Maladies Respiratoires, 28(10), 1265-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rmr.2011.04.017
Couturaud F. [The Optimal Duration of Anticoagulant Treatment Following Pulmonary Embolism]. Rev Mal Respir. 2011;28(10):1265-77. PubMed PMID: 22152935.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [The optimal duration of anticoagulant treatment following pulmonary embolism]. A1 - Couturaud,F, Y1 - 2011/11/03/ PY - 2010/10/28/received PY - 2011/04/07/accepted PY - 2011/12/14/entrez PY - 2011/12/14/pubmed PY - 2012/5/2/medline SP - 1265 EP - 77 JF - Revue des maladies respiratoires JO - Rev Mal Respir VL - 28 IS - 10 N2 - The optimal course of oral anticoagulant therapy is determined according to the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism after stopping therapy and the risk of anticoagulant-related bleeding. Clinical risk factors appear to be important in predicting the risk of recurrence whereas the influence of biochemical and morphological tests is uncertain. The risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism is low when the initial episode was provoked by a reversible major risk factor (surgery): 3 months of anticoagulation is sufficient. Conversely, the risk is high when venous thromboembolism was unprovoked or associated with persistent risk factor (cancer): 6 months or more prolonged anticoagulation is necessary. After this first estimation, the duration of anticoagulation may be modulated according to the presence or absence of certain additional risk factors (major thrombophilia, chronic pulmonary hypertension, massive pulmonary embolism): 6 months if pulmonary embolism was provoked and 12 to 24 months if pulmonary embolism was unprovoked. If the risk of anticoagulant-related bleeding is high, the duration of anticoagulation should be shortened (3 months if pulmonary embolism was provoked and 3 to 6 months if it was unprovoked). Lastly, if pulmonary embolism occurred in association with cancer, anticoagulation should be conducted for 6 months or more if the cancer is active or treatment is on going. Despite an increasing knowledge of the risk factors for recurrent venous thromboembolism, a number of issues remain unresolved. Randomised trials comparing different durations of anticoagulation are needed. SN - 1776-2588 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22152935/[The_optimal_duration_of_anticoagulant_treatment_following_pulmonary_embolism]_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0761-8425(11)00396-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -