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Sex and modulatory menstrual cycle effects on sleep related memory consolidation.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2012 Jul; 37(7):987-98.P

Abstract

The benefit of sleep in general for memory consolidation is well known. The relevance of sleep characteristics and the influence of hormones are not well studied. We explored the effects of a nap on memory consolidation of motor (finger-tapping-task) and verbal (associated-word-pairs) tasks in following settings: A: young, healthy males and females during early-follicular phase (n=40) and B: females during mid-luteal and early-follicular phase in the menstrual cycle (n=15). We found a sex and in women a menstrual cycle effect on memory performance following a nap. Men performed significantly better after a nap and women did so only in the mid-luteal phase of their menstrual cycle. Only the men and the women in their mid-luteal phase experienced a significant increase in spindle activity after learning. Furthermore, in women estrogen correlated significantly with the offline change in declarative learning and progesterone with motor learning. The ratio of the 2nd and 4th digit, which has been associated to fetal sex hormones and cognitive sex differences, significantly predicted the average performance of the female subjects in the learning tasks. Our results demonstrate that sleep-related memory consolidation has a higher complexity and more influencing factors than previously assumed. There is a sex and menstrual cycle effect, which seems to be mediated by female hormones and sleep spindles. Further, contrary to previous reports, consolidation of a simple motor task can be induced by a 45 min NREM sleep nap, thus not dependent on REM sleep.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Kreapelinstr.2-10, 80804 Munich, Germany. genzel@mpipsykl.mpg.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22153362

Citation

Genzel, Lisa, et al. "Sex and Modulatory Menstrual Cycle Effects On Sleep Related Memory Consolidation." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 37, no. 7, 2012, pp. 987-98.
Genzel L, Kiefer T, Renner L, et al. Sex and modulatory menstrual cycle effects on sleep related memory consolidation. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2012;37(7):987-98.
Genzel, L., Kiefer, T., Renner, L., Wehrle, R., Kluge, M., Grözinger, M., Steiger, A., & Dresler, M. (2012). Sex and modulatory menstrual cycle effects on sleep related memory consolidation. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 37(7), 987-98. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2011.11.006
Genzel L, et al. Sex and Modulatory Menstrual Cycle Effects On Sleep Related Memory Consolidation. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2012;37(7):987-98. PubMed PMID: 22153362.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sex and modulatory menstrual cycle effects on sleep related memory consolidation. AU - Genzel,Lisa, AU - Kiefer,Teresa, AU - Renner,Lisa, AU - Wehrle,Renate, AU - Kluge,Michael, AU - Grözinger,Michael, AU - Steiger,Axel, AU - Dresler,Martin, Y1 - 2011/12/07/ PY - 2011/08/30/received PY - 2011/11/14/revised PY - 2011/11/14/accepted PY - 2011/12/14/entrez PY - 2011/12/14/pubmed PY - 2012/10/10/medline SP - 987 EP - 98 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 37 IS - 7 N2 - The benefit of sleep in general for memory consolidation is well known. The relevance of sleep characteristics and the influence of hormones are not well studied. We explored the effects of a nap on memory consolidation of motor (finger-tapping-task) and verbal (associated-word-pairs) tasks in following settings: A: young, healthy males and females during early-follicular phase (n=40) and B: females during mid-luteal and early-follicular phase in the menstrual cycle (n=15). We found a sex and in women a menstrual cycle effect on memory performance following a nap. Men performed significantly better after a nap and women did so only in the mid-luteal phase of their menstrual cycle. Only the men and the women in their mid-luteal phase experienced a significant increase in spindle activity after learning. Furthermore, in women estrogen correlated significantly with the offline change in declarative learning and progesterone with motor learning. The ratio of the 2nd and 4th digit, which has been associated to fetal sex hormones and cognitive sex differences, significantly predicted the average performance of the female subjects in the learning tasks. Our results demonstrate that sleep-related memory consolidation has a higher complexity and more influencing factors than previously assumed. There is a sex and menstrual cycle effect, which seems to be mediated by female hormones and sleep spindles. Further, contrary to previous reports, consolidation of a simple motor task can be induced by a 45 min NREM sleep nap, thus not dependent on REM sleep. SN - 1873-3360 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22153362/Sex_and_modulatory_menstrual_cycle_effects_on_sleep_related_memory_consolidation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4530(11)00336-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -