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Work environment discomfort and injury: an ergonomic survey study of the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology members.
Am J Otolaryngol. 2012 Jul-Aug; 33(4):441-6.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Workplace-related musculoskeletal pain has been studied in various occupations, but it is rarely reported in the surgical literature.

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to examine work-related discomfort and injury among pediatric otolaryngologists and to assess their knowledge of workplace ergonomic principles.

METHODS

We surveyed current North American members of the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology. Our main outcomes were whether the physician had ever experienced discomfort or physical symptoms that they attributed to their surgical practice.

RESULTS

Response rate of 43.7% was attained, and 62.0% of respondents reported experiencing pain or discomfort that they attributed to their surgical practice. Women were significantly more likely to report experiencing pain or discomfort that they associated with their surgical practice (P = .033). There were no significant differences found among length of time in practice, academic vs community setting, or number of surgeries completed by the surgeon. Some of the surgeons (31.0%) were aware of ergonomic principles, and of those who were aware, 83.9% had implemented ergonomic principles into their surgical practice.

CONCLUSION

Almost two thirds of surgeons who responded to the survey reported experiencing pain or discomfort that they attributed to their surgical practice. Only a minority of respondents were aware of ergonomic principles. These findings may confirm that most physicians believe that their physical health is affected by their operative environment. Increased knowledge of surgical ergonomics may lead to strategies that improve workplace health and safety.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. jpcnfld@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22154017

Citation

Cavanagh, Jonathan, et al. "Work Environment Discomfort and Injury: an Ergonomic Survey Study of the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology Members." American Journal of Otolaryngology, vol. 33, no. 4, 2012, pp. 441-6.
Cavanagh J, Brake M, Kearns D, et al. Work environment discomfort and injury: an ergonomic survey study of the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology members. Am J Otolaryngol. 2012;33(4):441-6.
Cavanagh, J., Brake, M., Kearns, D., & Hong, P. (2012). Work environment discomfort and injury: an ergonomic survey study of the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology members. American Journal of Otolaryngology, 33(4), 441-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2011.10.022
Cavanagh J, et al. Work Environment Discomfort and Injury: an Ergonomic Survey Study of the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology Members. Am J Otolaryngol. 2012 Jul-Aug;33(4):441-6. PubMed PMID: 22154017.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Work environment discomfort and injury: an ergonomic survey study of the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology members. AU - Cavanagh,Jonathan, AU - Brake,Maria, AU - Kearns,Donald, AU - Hong,Paul, Y1 - 2011/12/07/ PY - 2011/09/02/received PY - 2011/10/24/revised PY - 2011/10/26/accepted PY - 2011/12/14/entrez PY - 2011/12/14/pubmed PY - 2012/12/10/medline SP - 441 EP - 6 JF - American journal of otolaryngology JO - Am J Otolaryngol VL - 33 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Workplace-related musculoskeletal pain has been studied in various occupations, but it is rarely reported in the surgical literature. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine work-related discomfort and injury among pediatric otolaryngologists and to assess their knowledge of workplace ergonomic principles. METHODS: We surveyed current North American members of the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology. Our main outcomes were whether the physician had ever experienced discomfort or physical symptoms that they attributed to their surgical practice. RESULTS: Response rate of 43.7% was attained, and 62.0% of respondents reported experiencing pain or discomfort that they attributed to their surgical practice. Women were significantly more likely to report experiencing pain or discomfort that they associated with their surgical practice (P = .033). There were no significant differences found among length of time in practice, academic vs community setting, or number of surgeries completed by the surgeon. Some of the surgeons (31.0%) were aware of ergonomic principles, and of those who were aware, 83.9% had implemented ergonomic principles into their surgical practice. CONCLUSION: Almost two thirds of surgeons who responded to the survey reported experiencing pain or discomfort that they attributed to their surgical practice. Only a minority of respondents were aware of ergonomic principles. These findings may confirm that most physicians believe that their physical health is affected by their operative environment. Increased knowledge of surgical ergonomics may lead to strategies that improve workplace health and safety. SN - 1532-818X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22154017/Work_environment_discomfort_and_injury:_an_ergonomic_survey_study_of_the_American_Society_of_Pediatric_Otolaryngology_members_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0196-0709(11)00284-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -