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Fast detection of unexpected sound intensity decrements as revealed by human evoked potentials.
PLoS One. 2011; 6(12):e28522.Plos

Abstract

The detection of deviant sounds is a crucial function of the auditory system and is reflected by the automatically elicited mismatch negativity (MMN), an auditory evoked potential at 100 to 250 ms from stimulus onset. It has recently been shown that rarely occurring frequency and location deviants in an oddball paradigm trigger a more negative response than standard sounds at very early latencies in the middle latency response of the human auditory evoked potential. This fast and early ability of the auditory system is corroborated by the finding of neurons in the animal auditory cortex and subcortical structures, which restore their adapted responsiveness to standard sounds, when a rare change in a sound feature occurs. In this study, we investigated whether the detection of intensity deviants is also reflected at shorter latencies than those of the MMN. Auditory evoked potentials in response to click sounds were analyzed regarding the auditory brain stem response, the middle latency response (MLR) and the MMN. Rare stimuli with a lower intensity level than standard stimuli elicited (in addition to an MMN) a more negative potential in the MLR at the transition from the Na to the Pa component at circa 24 ms from stimulus onset. This finding, together with the studies about frequency and location changes, suggests that the early automatic detection of deviant sounds in an oddball paradigm is a general property of the auditory system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior (IR3C), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22163029

Citation

Althen, Heike, et al. "Fast Detection of Unexpected Sound Intensity Decrements as Revealed By Human Evoked Potentials." PloS One, vol. 6, no. 12, 2011, pp. e28522.
Althen H, Grimm S, Escera C. Fast detection of unexpected sound intensity decrements as revealed by human evoked potentials. PLoS One. 2011;6(12):e28522.
Althen, H., Grimm, S., & Escera, C. (2011). Fast detection of unexpected sound intensity decrements as revealed by human evoked potentials. PloS One, 6(12), e28522. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0028522
Althen H, Grimm S, Escera C. Fast Detection of Unexpected Sound Intensity Decrements as Revealed By Human Evoked Potentials. PLoS One. 2011;6(12):e28522. PubMed PMID: 22163029.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fast detection of unexpected sound intensity decrements as revealed by human evoked potentials. AU - Althen,Heike, AU - Grimm,Sabine, AU - Escera,Carles, Y1 - 2011/12/06/ PY - 2011/08/15/received PY - 2011/11/09/accepted PY - 2011/12/14/entrez PY - 2011/12/14/pubmed PY - 2012/7/21/medline SP - e28522 EP - e28522 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 6 IS - 12 N2 - The detection of deviant sounds is a crucial function of the auditory system and is reflected by the automatically elicited mismatch negativity (MMN), an auditory evoked potential at 100 to 250 ms from stimulus onset. It has recently been shown that rarely occurring frequency and location deviants in an oddball paradigm trigger a more negative response than standard sounds at very early latencies in the middle latency response of the human auditory evoked potential. This fast and early ability of the auditory system is corroborated by the finding of neurons in the animal auditory cortex and subcortical structures, which restore their adapted responsiveness to standard sounds, when a rare change in a sound feature occurs. In this study, we investigated whether the detection of intensity deviants is also reflected at shorter latencies than those of the MMN. Auditory evoked potentials in response to click sounds were analyzed regarding the auditory brain stem response, the middle latency response (MLR) and the MMN. Rare stimuli with a lower intensity level than standard stimuli elicited (in addition to an MMN) a more negative potential in the MLR at the transition from the Na to the Pa component at circa 24 ms from stimulus onset. This finding, together with the studies about frequency and location changes, suggests that the early automatic detection of deviant sounds in an oddball paradigm is a general property of the auditory system. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22163029/Fast_detection_of_unexpected_sound_intensity_decrements_as_revealed_by_human_evoked_potentials_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0028522 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -