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Survival effects of prenatal famine exposure.
Am J Clin Nutr 2012; 95(1):179-83AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Adverse intrauterine conditions are known to be associated with an increased risk of chronic diseases in adult life. Previously, we showed that prenatal famine exposure increased the incidence of cardiovascular and metabolic disease in adulthood.

OBJECTIVE

We examined the association between prenatal famine exposure and adult mortality.

DESIGN

We studied adult mortality among 1991 term singletons from the Dutch Famine Birth Cohort. We compared overall and cause-specific adult mortality among people exposed to famine in late, mid, and early gestation with those unexposed to famine in utero by using Cox proportional hazard models.

RESULTS

A total of 206 persons (10%) had died by the end of follow-up. Compared with unexposed women, women exposed to famine in early gestation had a significantly higher risk of overall adult mortality (HR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.4), cardiovascular mortality (HR: 4.6; 95% CI: 1.2, 17.7), cancer mortality (HR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.1, 4.7), and breast cancer mortality (HR: 8.3; 95% CI: 1.1, 63.0). In men exposed to famine in early gestation, these associations were as follows compared with unexposed men: overall adult mortality (HR: 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2, 1.1), cardiovascular mortality (HR: 0.9; 95% CI: 0.3, 3.1), and cancer mortality (HR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.0, 1.9).

CONCLUSIONS

Women exposed to famine in early gestation had a higher overall adult, cardiovascular, cancer, and breast cancer mortality risk than did women not exposed to famine. No such effects were observed in men exposed to famine in early gestation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics and Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands. a.f.vanabeelen@amc.uva.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22170371

Citation

van Abeelen, Annet F M., et al. "Survival Effects of Prenatal Famine Exposure." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 95, no. 1, 2012, pp. 179-83.
van Abeelen AF, Veenendaal MV, Painter RC, et al. Survival effects of prenatal famine exposure. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;95(1):179-83.
van Abeelen, A. F., Veenendaal, M. V., Painter, R. C., de Rooij, S. R., Dijkgraaf, M. G., Bossuyt, P. M., ... Roseboom, T. J. (2012). Survival effects of prenatal famine exposure. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 95(1), pp. 179-83. doi:10.3945/ajcn.111.022038.
van Abeelen AF, et al. Survival Effects of Prenatal Famine Exposure. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;95(1):179-83. PubMed PMID: 22170371.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Survival effects of prenatal famine exposure. AU - van Abeelen,Annet F M, AU - Veenendaal,Marjolein V E, AU - Painter,Rebecca C, AU - de Rooij,Susanne R, AU - Dijkgraaf,Marcel G W, AU - Bossuyt,Patrick M M, AU - Elias,Sjoerd G, AU - Grobbee,Diederick E, AU - Uiterwaal,Cuno S P M, AU - Roseboom,Tessa J, Y1 - 2011/12/14/ PY - 2011/12/16/entrez PY - 2011/12/16/pubmed PY - 2012/2/18/medline SP - 179 EP - 83 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 95 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Adverse intrauterine conditions are known to be associated with an increased risk of chronic diseases in adult life. Previously, we showed that prenatal famine exposure increased the incidence of cardiovascular and metabolic disease in adulthood. OBJECTIVE: We examined the association between prenatal famine exposure and adult mortality. DESIGN: We studied adult mortality among 1991 term singletons from the Dutch Famine Birth Cohort. We compared overall and cause-specific adult mortality among people exposed to famine in late, mid, and early gestation with those unexposed to famine in utero by using Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: A total of 206 persons (10%) had died by the end of follow-up. Compared with unexposed women, women exposed to famine in early gestation had a significantly higher risk of overall adult mortality (HR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.4), cardiovascular mortality (HR: 4.6; 95% CI: 1.2, 17.7), cancer mortality (HR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.1, 4.7), and breast cancer mortality (HR: 8.3; 95% CI: 1.1, 63.0). In men exposed to famine in early gestation, these associations were as follows compared with unexposed men: overall adult mortality (HR: 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2, 1.1), cardiovascular mortality (HR: 0.9; 95% CI: 0.3, 3.1), and cancer mortality (HR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.0, 1.9). CONCLUSIONS: Women exposed to famine in early gestation had a higher overall adult, cardiovascular, cancer, and breast cancer mortality risk than did women not exposed to famine. No such effects were observed in men exposed to famine in early gestation. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22170371/Survival_effects_of_prenatal_famine_exposure_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.111.022038 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -