Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Occupational hazards of endoscopic surgery.
Int Forum Allergy Rhinol. 2012 May-Jun; 2(3):212-6.IF

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Minimally invasive surgery has taken its toll on the physical well-being of surgeons. There have been many physical consequences for surgeons. However, few have been investigated, specifically for otolaryngologists performing endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES). The purpose of this study is to define the prevalence, quality, and severity of physical symptoms that otolaryngologists experience as they relate to the surgeons' use of ergonomically designed endoscopic instruments in endonasal surgery.

METHODS

A 25-question survey was administered between September 2010 and March 2011 to practicing otolaryngologists. The questions addressed demographics, physical symptoms, ergonomics, and operating room environment. Data were analyzed using Fisher's exact, Wilcoxon rank sum, and Jonckheere-Terpstra statistics.

RESULTS

Sixty-two surgeons responded with a median age of 36 years. Responders performed a median of 150 EESs per year and 37% had completed an endoscopic fellowship. The majority (77%) of responders had experienced physical discomfort or symptoms that they attributed to EES. Thirteen percent (13%) of those who had experienced symptoms felt that their symptoms were persistent. Only 23% of those experiencing symptoms had sought medical care. No significant associations were seen between surgeon age, number of cases, standing, or having adjustable video display with experiencing discomfort (all p > 0.49). Interestingly, fewer surgeons completing an endoscopic fellowship experienced discomfort (70% vs 82%, p = 0.35).

CONCLUSION

Our data showed that 77% of physicians who regularly perform EES suffer physical discomfort or symptoms attributable to EES. As expanded endonasal procedures become more prevalent, additional data and ergonomic analysis are necessary to reverse this trend and reduce possible long-term damage for surgeons.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22170758

Citation

Little, Rachel M., et al. "Occupational Hazards of Endoscopic Surgery." International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology, vol. 2, no. 3, 2012, pp. 212-6.
Little RM, Deal AM, Zanation AM, et al. Occupational hazards of endoscopic surgery. Int Forum Allergy Rhinol. 2012;2(3):212-6.
Little, R. M., Deal, A. M., Zanation, A. M., McKinney, K., Senior, B. A., & Ebert, C. S. (2012). Occupational hazards of endoscopic surgery. International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology, 2(3), 212-6. https://doi.org/10.1002/alr.20108
Little RM, et al. Occupational Hazards of Endoscopic Surgery. Int Forum Allergy Rhinol. 2012 May-Jun;2(3):212-6. PubMed PMID: 22170758.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Occupational hazards of endoscopic surgery. AU - Little,Rachel M, AU - Deal,Allison M, AU - Zanation,Adam M, AU - McKinney,Kibwei, AU - Senior,Brent A, AU - Ebert,Charles S,Jr Y1 - 2011/12/13/ PY - 2011/08/15/received PY - 2011/09/30/revised PY - 2011/11/01/accepted PY - 2011/12/16/entrez PY - 2011/12/16/pubmed PY - 2012/8/29/medline SP - 212 EP - 6 JF - International forum of allergy & rhinology JO - Int Forum Allergy Rhinol VL - 2 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive surgery has taken its toll on the physical well-being of surgeons. There have been many physical consequences for surgeons. However, few have been investigated, specifically for otolaryngologists performing endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES). The purpose of this study is to define the prevalence, quality, and severity of physical symptoms that otolaryngologists experience as they relate to the surgeons' use of ergonomically designed endoscopic instruments in endonasal surgery. METHODS: A 25-question survey was administered between September 2010 and March 2011 to practicing otolaryngologists. The questions addressed demographics, physical symptoms, ergonomics, and operating room environment. Data were analyzed using Fisher's exact, Wilcoxon rank sum, and Jonckheere-Terpstra statistics. RESULTS: Sixty-two surgeons responded with a median age of 36 years. Responders performed a median of 150 EESs per year and 37% had completed an endoscopic fellowship. The majority (77%) of responders had experienced physical discomfort or symptoms that they attributed to EES. Thirteen percent (13%) of those who had experienced symptoms felt that their symptoms were persistent. Only 23% of those experiencing symptoms had sought medical care. No significant associations were seen between surgeon age, number of cases, standing, or having adjustable video display with experiencing discomfort (all p > 0.49). Interestingly, fewer surgeons completing an endoscopic fellowship experienced discomfort (70% vs 82%, p = 0.35). CONCLUSION: Our data showed that 77% of physicians who regularly perform EES suffer physical discomfort or symptoms attributable to EES. As expanded endonasal procedures become more prevalent, additional data and ergonomic analysis are necessary to reverse this trend and reduce possible long-term damage for surgeons. SN - 2042-6984 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22170758/Occupational_hazards_of_endoscopic_surgery_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/alr.20108 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -