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The neoplastic impact of tobacco-free betel-quid on the histological type and the anatomical site of aerodigestive tract cancers.
Int J Cancer 2012; 131(5):E733-43IJ

Abstract

Little is known about any consequences of swallowing tobacco-free betel-quid (TF-BQ) juice/remnants following chewing and its carcinogenic impact on the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) to gastrointestinal tract (GIT). We investigated the neoplastic impact of TF-BQ on different anatomical locations along UADT and GIT, and differences according to their histological categories. We conducted a multicenter case-control study examining patients with 2,163 pathology-proven UADT and GIT cancers, comparing them with 2,250 control subjects. Generalized additive models, piecewise regression and polytomous logistic models were applied to identify possible dose-dependent structures and cancer risks. Contrary to nonsignificant GIT-adenocarcinoma risk (aOR=0.9), TF-BQ users experienced a 1.7- to 16.2-fold higher risk of UADT-squamous cell carcinomas than nonusers, with the peak risk discovered in oral neoplasms. We separately observed a curvilinear and linear TF-BQ dose-risk relationship in oral/pharyngeal/esophageal and laryngeal cancers. Chewers of betel inflorescence were generally at a greater UADT cancer risk. A higher first-piecewise increased risk of esophageal cancer was recognized among areca-fluid swallowers than among nonswallowers (continuous aOR=1.12 vs. 1.03). TF-BQ use accounted for 66.1-78.7% and 17.8-33.2% of the cases of oral/pharyngeal and esophageal/laryngeal cancers, respectively. However, a reduction from heavy TF-BQ consumption to low-to-moderate consumption only reduced 11.3-34.6% of etiologic fraction of oral/pharyngeal cancers. Alcohol supra-additively modified the risk of TF-BQ in determining the development of oral, pharyngeal and esophageal cancers. In conclusion, the interplay of TF-BQ and alcohol/tobacco use, combined with how chewing habit is practiced, influences carcinogenic consequences on anatomically diverse sites of UADT and GIT cancers, and histologically different types.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, Kaohsiung Medical University, and Department of Otolaryngology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22174014

Citation

Lee, Chien-Hung, et al. "The Neoplastic Impact of Tobacco-free Betel-quid On the Histological Type and the Anatomical Site of Aerodigestive Tract Cancers." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 131, no. 5, 2012, pp. E733-43.
Lee CH, Lee KW, Fang FM, et al. The neoplastic impact of tobacco-free betel-quid on the histological type and the anatomical site of aerodigestive tract cancers. Int J Cancer. 2012;131(5):E733-43.
Lee, C. H., Lee, K. W., Fang, F. M., Wu, D. C., Tsai, S. M., Chen, P. H., ... Ko, Y. C. (2012). The neoplastic impact of tobacco-free betel-quid on the histological type and the anatomical site of aerodigestive tract cancers. International Journal of Cancer, 131(5), pp. E733-43. doi:10.1002/ijc.27401.
Lee CH, et al. The Neoplastic Impact of Tobacco-free Betel-quid On the Histological Type and the Anatomical Site of Aerodigestive Tract Cancers. Int J Cancer. 2012 Sep 1;131(5):E733-43. PubMed PMID: 22174014.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The neoplastic impact of tobacco-free betel-quid on the histological type and the anatomical site of aerodigestive tract cancers. AU - Lee,Chien-Hung, AU - Lee,Ka-Wo, AU - Fang,Fu-Min, AU - Wu,Deng-Chyang, AU - Tsai,Shih-Meng, AU - Chen,Ping-Ho, AU - Shieh,Tien-Yu, AU - Chen,Chung-Ho, AU - Wu,I-Chen, AU - Huang,Hsiao-Ling, AU - Chen,Bai-Hsiun, AU - Chang,Cheng-Hsien, AU - Chen,Mu-Kuan, AU - Chou,Shah-Hwa, AU - Tsai,Yi-Shan, AU - Chiang,Shang-Lun, AU - Ko,Ying-Chin, Y1 - 2012/02/18/ PY - 2011/03/16/received PY - 2011/11/28/accepted PY - 2011/12/17/entrez PY - 2011/12/17/pubmed PY - 2012/9/21/medline SP - E733 EP - 43 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 131 IS - 5 N2 - Little is known about any consequences of swallowing tobacco-free betel-quid (TF-BQ) juice/remnants following chewing and its carcinogenic impact on the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) to gastrointestinal tract (GIT). We investigated the neoplastic impact of TF-BQ on different anatomical locations along UADT and GIT, and differences according to their histological categories. We conducted a multicenter case-control study examining patients with 2,163 pathology-proven UADT and GIT cancers, comparing them with 2,250 control subjects. Generalized additive models, piecewise regression and polytomous logistic models were applied to identify possible dose-dependent structures and cancer risks. Contrary to nonsignificant GIT-adenocarcinoma risk (aOR=0.9), TF-BQ users experienced a 1.7- to 16.2-fold higher risk of UADT-squamous cell carcinomas than nonusers, with the peak risk discovered in oral neoplasms. We separately observed a curvilinear and linear TF-BQ dose-risk relationship in oral/pharyngeal/esophageal and laryngeal cancers. Chewers of betel inflorescence were generally at a greater UADT cancer risk. A higher first-piecewise increased risk of esophageal cancer was recognized among areca-fluid swallowers than among nonswallowers (continuous aOR=1.12 vs. 1.03). TF-BQ use accounted for 66.1-78.7% and 17.8-33.2% of the cases of oral/pharyngeal and esophageal/laryngeal cancers, respectively. However, a reduction from heavy TF-BQ consumption to low-to-moderate consumption only reduced 11.3-34.6% of etiologic fraction of oral/pharyngeal cancers. Alcohol supra-additively modified the risk of TF-BQ in determining the development of oral, pharyngeal and esophageal cancers. In conclusion, the interplay of TF-BQ and alcohol/tobacco use, combined with how chewing habit is practiced, influences carcinogenic consequences on anatomically diverse sites of UADT and GIT cancers, and histologically different types. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22174014/The_neoplastic_impact_of_tobacco_free_betel_quid_on_the_histological_type_and_the_anatomical_site_of_aerodigestive_tract_cancers_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.27401 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -