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Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ocular infection: a 10-year hospital-based study.
Ophthalmology 2012; 119(3):522-7O

Abstract

PURPOSE

To characterize the patient demographics, clinical features, and antibiotic susceptibility of ocular infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including community-associated (CA) and healthcare-associated (HA) isolates.

DESIGN

Retrospective, observational study.

PARTICIPANTS

Patients (n = 519) with culture-proven S. aureus ocular infections seen between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2008, in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital.

METHODS

Data collected included patient demographics and clinical information. Antibiotic susceptibility was verified by disc diffusion method.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Proportion of MRSA in S. aureus ocular infections and the clinical characteristics, diagnoses, and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of CA-MRSA versus HA-MRSA ocular infections.

RESULTS

We identified 274 patients with MRSA ocular infections, which comprised 181 CA-MRSA and 93 HA-MRSA isolates. The average rate of MRSA in S. aureus infections was 52.8% with a stable trend, whereas the annual ratio of CA-MRSA in ocular MRSA infections averaged 66.1% and tended to increase over the 10-year interval. Patients with ocular CA-MRSA were younger. Lid and lacrimal system disorders were more common, but keratitis, endophthalmitis, and wound infection were less common among CA-MRSA cases than HA-MRSA cases. Both CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA isolates were resistant to clindamycin and erythromycin, but CA-MRSA was more susceptible to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim.

CONCLUSIONS

Community-associated MRSA is an important pathogen of ocular infections; CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA ocular infections differ demographically and clinically, but both strains were multi-resistant in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, one of the biggest referral centers in Taiwan. In a country with a high prevalence of MRSA, ophthalmologists should be aware of such epidemiologic information.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22176801

Citation

Hsiao, Ching-Hsi, et al. "Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Ocular Infection: a 10-year Hospital-based Study." Ophthalmology, vol. 119, no. 3, 2012, pp. 522-7.
Hsiao CH, Chuang CC, Tan HY, et al. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ocular infection: a 10-year hospital-based study. Ophthalmology. 2012;119(3):522-7.
Hsiao, C. H., Chuang, C. C., Tan, H. Y., Ma, D. H., Lin, K. K., Chang, C. J., & Huang, Y. C. (2012). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ocular infection: a 10-year hospital-based study. Ophthalmology, 119(3), pp. 522-7. doi:10.1016/j.ophtha.2011.08.038.
Hsiao CH, et al. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Ocular Infection: a 10-year Hospital-based Study. Ophthalmology. 2012;119(3):522-7. PubMed PMID: 22176801.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ocular infection: a 10-year hospital-based study. AU - Hsiao,Ching-Hsi, AU - Chuang,Chih-Chun, AU - Tan,Hsin-Yuan, AU - Ma,David H K, AU - Lin,Ken-Kuo, AU - Chang,Chee-Jen, AU - Huang,Yhu-Chering, Y1 - 2011/12/15/ PY - 2011/07/29/received PY - 2011/08/22/revised PY - 2011/08/22/accepted PY - 2011/12/20/entrez PY - 2011/12/20/pubmed PY - 2012/4/28/medline SP - 522 EP - 7 JF - Ophthalmology JO - Ophthalmology VL - 119 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: To characterize the patient demographics, clinical features, and antibiotic susceptibility of ocular infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including community-associated (CA) and healthcare-associated (HA) isolates. DESIGN: Retrospective, observational study. PARTICIPANTS: Patients (n = 519) with culture-proven S. aureus ocular infections seen between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2008, in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. METHODS: Data collected included patient demographics and clinical information. Antibiotic susceptibility was verified by disc diffusion method. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of MRSA in S. aureus ocular infections and the clinical characteristics, diagnoses, and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of CA-MRSA versus HA-MRSA ocular infections. RESULTS: We identified 274 patients with MRSA ocular infections, which comprised 181 CA-MRSA and 93 HA-MRSA isolates. The average rate of MRSA in S. aureus infections was 52.8% with a stable trend, whereas the annual ratio of CA-MRSA in ocular MRSA infections averaged 66.1% and tended to increase over the 10-year interval. Patients with ocular CA-MRSA were younger. Lid and lacrimal system disorders were more common, but keratitis, endophthalmitis, and wound infection were less common among CA-MRSA cases than HA-MRSA cases. Both CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA isolates were resistant to clindamycin and erythromycin, but CA-MRSA was more susceptible to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. CONCLUSIONS: Community-associated MRSA is an important pathogen of ocular infections; CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA ocular infections differ demographically and clinically, but both strains were multi-resistant in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, one of the biggest referral centers in Taiwan. In a country with a high prevalence of MRSA, ophthalmologists should be aware of such epidemiologic information. SN - 1549-4713 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22176801/Methicillin_resistant_Staphylococcus_aureus_ocular_infection:_a_10_year_hospital_based_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0161-6420(11)00803-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -