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Attitudes and dilemmas of caregivers supporting people with intellectual disabilities who have diabetes.
Patient Educ Couns 2012; 87(3):383-8PE

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To explore how professional caregivers in communal living arrangements support people with a mild or moderate intellectual disability (ID) who have diabetes.

METHODS

A qualitative study, 13 caregivers participated in semi-structured interviews.

RESULTS

Professional caregiver support in diabetes care is almost solely directed towards administering medication and controlling food intake. Caregivers want to provide person-centered care but are hindered by a conflict between protecting a client's health and at the same time respecting autonomy. None of the caregivers had received training in supporting self-management; their knowledge about diabetes is limited. The few that engaged their client in self-management stressed the importance of a positive and collaborative approach.

CONCLUSION

This study provides a first insight into the challenges that professional caregivers experience when a client with ID has diabetes. More education for caregivers seems needed. Self-management support is likely to benefit from consensus among caregivers about what comprises person-centered care and self-management in people with ID who have a chronic disease.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS

Increasing caregivers' awareness of the importance of supporting self-management in people with ID and a chronic disease is essential. Discussing practice examples in the light of existing knowledge about developing autonomy will contribute to their awareness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

NIVEL (Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research), Utrecht, The Netherlands. m.cardol@nivel.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22178391

Citation

Cardol, Mieke, et al. "Attitudes and Dilemmas of Caregivers Supporting People With Intellectual Disabilities Who Have Diabetes." Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 87, no. 3, 2012, pp. 383-8.
Cardol M, Rijken M, van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk H. Attitudes and dilemmas of caregivers supporting people with intellectual disabilities who have diabetes. Patient Educ Couns. 2012;87(3):383-8.
Cardol, M., Rijken, M., & van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, H. (2012). Attitudes and dilemmas of caregivers supporting people with intellectual disabilities who have diabetes. Patient Education and Counseling, 87(3), pp. 383-8. doi:10.1016/j.pec.2011.11.010.
Cardol M, Rijken M, van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk H. Attitudes and Dilemmas of Caregivers Supporting People With Intellectual Disabilities Who Have Diabetes. Patient Educ Couns. 2012;87(3):383-8. PubMed PMID: 22178391.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Attitudes and dilemmas of caregivers supporting people with intellectual disabilities who have diabetes. AU - Cardol,Mieke, AU - Rijken,Mieke, AU - van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk,Henny, Y1 - 2011/12/16/ PY - 2011/06/15/received PY - 2011/10/31/revised PY - 2011/11/22/accepted PY - 2011/12/20/entrez PY - 2011/12/20/pubmed PY - 2012/9/20/medline SP - 383 EP - 8 JF - Patient education and counseling JO - Patient Educ Couns VL - 87 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To explore how professional caregivers in communal living arrangements support people with a mild or moderate intellectual disability (ID) who have diabetes. METHODS: A qualitative study, 13 caregivers participated in semi-structured interviews. RESULTS: Professional caregiver support in diabetes care is almost solely directed towards administering medication and controlling food intake. Caregivers want to provide person-centered care but are hindered by a conflict between protecting a client's health and at the same time respecting autonomy. None of the caregivers had received training in supporting self-management; their knowledge about diabetes is limited. The few that engaged their client in self-management stressed the importance of a positive and collaborative approach. CONCLUSION: This study provides a first insight into the challenges that professional caregivers experience when a client with ID has diabetes. More education for caregivers seems needed. Self-management support is likely to benefit from consensus among caregivers about what comprises person-centered care and self-management in people with ID who have a chronic disease. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Increasing caregivers' awareness of the importance of supporting self-management in people with ID and a chronic disease is essential. Discussing practice examples in the light of existing knowledge about developing autonomy will contribute to their awareness. SN - 1873-5134 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22178391/Attitudes_and_dilemmas_of_caregivers_supporting_people_with_intellectual_disabilities_who_have_diabetes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738-3991(11)00573-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -