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Yoga for persistent fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial.
Cancer 2012; 118(15):3766-75C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Cancer-related fatigue afflicts up to 33% of breast cancer survivors, yet there are no empirically validated treatments for this symptom.

METHODS

The authors conducted a 2-group randomized controlled trial to determine the feasibility and efficacy of an Iyengar yoga intervention for breast cancer survivors with persistent post-treatment fatigue. Participants were breast cancer survivors who had completed cancer treatments (other than endocrine therapy) at least 6 months before enrollment, reported significant cancer-related fatigue, and had no other medical conditions that would account for fatigue symptoms or interfere with yoga practice. Block randomization was used to assign participants to a 12-week, Iyengar-based yoga intervention or to 12 weeks of health education (control). The primary outcome was change in fatigue measured at baseline, immediately post-treatment, and 3 months after treatment completion. Additional outcomes included changes in vigor, depressive symptoms, sleep, perceived stress, and physical performance. Intent-to-treat analyses were conducted with all randomized participants using linear mixed models.

RESULTS

Thirty-one women were randomly assigned to yoga (n = 16) or health education (n = 15). Fatigue severity declined significantly from baseline to post-treatment and over a 3-month follow-up in the yoga group relative to controls (P = .032). In addition, the yoga group had significant increases in vigor relative to controls (P = .011). Both groups had positive changes in depressive symptoms and perceived stress (P < .05). No significant changes in sleep or physical performance were observed.

CONCLUSIONS

A targeted yoga intervention led to significant improvements in fatigue and vigor among breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of California-Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. jbower@ucla.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22180393

Citation

Bower, Julienne E., et al. "Yoga for Persistent Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors: a Randomized Controlled Trial." Cancer, vol. 118, no. 15, 2012, pp. 3766-75.
Bower JE, Garet D, Sternlieb B, et al. Yoga for persistent fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial. Cancer. 2012;118(15):3766-75.
Bower, J. E., Garet, D., Sternlieb, B., Ganz, P. A., Irwin, M. R., Olmstead, R., & Greendale, G. (2012). Yoga for persistent fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial. Cancer, 118(15), pp. 3766-75. doi:10.1002/cncr.26702.
Bower JE, et al. Yoga for Persistent Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Cancer. 2012 Aug 1;118(15):3766-75. PubMed PMID: 22180393.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Yoga for persistent fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Bower,Julienne E, AU - Garet,Deborah, AU - Sternlieb,Beth, AU - Ganz,Patricia A, AU - Irwin,Michael R, AU - Olmstead,Richard, AU - Greendale,Gail, Y1 - 2011/12/16/ PY - 2011/09/09/received PY - 2011/10/14/revised PY - 2011/10/17/accepted PY - 2011/12/20/entrez PY - 2011/12/20/pubmed PY - 2012/9/29/medline SP - 3766 EP - 75 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 118 IS - 15 N2 - BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue afflicts up to 33% of breast cancer survivors, yet there are no empirically validated treatments for this symptom. METHODS: The authors conducted a 2-group randomized controlled trial to determine the feasibility and efficacy of an Iyengar yoga intervention for breast cancer survivors with persistent post-treatment fatigue. Participants were breast cancer survivors who had completed cancer treatments (other than endocrine therapy) at least 6 months before enrollment, reported significant cancer-related fatigue, and had no other medical conditions that would account for fatigue symptoms or interfere with yoga practice. Block randomization was used to assign participants to a 12-week, Iyengar-based yoga intervention or to 12 weeks of health education (control). The primary outcome was change in fatigue measured at baseline, immediately post-treatment, and 3 months after treatment completion. Additional outcomes included changes in vigor, depressive symptoms, sleep, perceived stress, and physical performance. Intent-to-treat analyses were conducted with all randomized participants using linear mixed models. RESULTS: Thirty-one women were randomly assigned to yoga (n = 16) or health education (n = 15). Fatigue severity declined significantly from baseline to post-treatment and over a 3-month follow-up in the yoga group relative to controls (P = .032). In addition, the yoga group had significant increases in vigor relative to controls (P = .011). Both groups had positive changes in depressive symptoms and perceived stress (P < .05). No significant changes in sleep or physical performance were observed. CONCLUSIONS: A targeted yoga intervention led to significant improvements in fatigue and vigor among breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue symptoms. SN - 1097-0142 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22180393/Yoga_for_persistent_fatigue_in_breast_cancer_survivors:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.26702 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -