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Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in preschool children with allergic rhinitis.
Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2011 Sep-Oct; 25(5):e186-90.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nonasthmatic subjects with allergic rhinitis often have bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), characteristic of asthma. The presence and degree of atopy is suggested to be important for BHR in patients with asthma. We aimed to assess BHR to methacholine (direct stimulus) and to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP; indirect stimulus) in preschool children with allergic rhinitis and to investigate their relationship with the degree of atopy.

METHODS

Methacholine and AMP bronchial challenges were performed in preschool children with allergic rhinitis (n = 96), using a modified auscultation method. The end point concentration, resulting in audible wheezing and/or oxygen desaturation, was determined for each challenge. The degree of atopy was assessed using serum total IgE levels, the number of positive skin-prick tests, and atopic scores (sum of graded wheal size).

RESULTS

BHR to methacholine (end point concentration, ≤8 mg/mL) and to AMP (end point concentration, ≤200 mg/mL) was observed in 32 (33.3%) and 26 (27.1%) subjects, respectively. No significant relationship was observed between BHR to methacholine and any atopy parameter. In contrast, the atopic scores were higher in the AMP-BHR(+) group compared with the AMP-BHR(-) group, and a significant association was found between the degree of atopic scores and the frequency of BHR to AMP (score for trend, p = 0.006). Such a relationship was not observed for serum total IgE levels and the number of positive SPTs.

CONCLUSION

BHR to methacholine and BHR to AMP were detected in a significant proportion of preschool children with allergic rhinitis. The degree of atopy in terms of atopic scores seems to be an important factor for BHR to AMP but not for BHR to methacholine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Hospital, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22186236

Citation

Suh, Dong In, et al. "Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness in Preschool Children With Allergic Rhinitis." American Journal of Rhinology & Allergy, vol. 25, no. 5, 2011, pp. e186-90.
Suh DI, Lee JK, Kim JT, et al. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in preschool children with allergic rhinitis. Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2011;25(5):e186-90.
Suh, D. I., Lee, J. K., Kim, J. T., Min, Y. G., & Koh, Y. Y. (2011). Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in preschool children with allergic rhinitis. American Journal of Rhinology & Allergy, 25(5), e186-90. https://doi.org/10.2500/ajra.2011.25.3685
Suh DI, et al. Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness in Preschool Children With Allergic Rhinitis. Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2011 Sep-Oct;25(5):e186-90. PubMed PMID: 22186236.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in preschool children with allergic rhinitis. AU - Suh,Dong In, AU - Lee,Ju Kyung, AU - Kim,Jin Tack, AU - Min,Yang-Gi, AU - Koh,Young Yull, PY - 2011/12/22/entrez PY - 2011/12/22/pubmed PY - 2012/5/10/medline SP - e186 EP - 90 JF - American journal of rhinology & allergy JO - Am J Rhinol Allergy VL - 25 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nonasthmatic subjects with allergic rhinitis often have bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), characteristic of asthma. The presence and degree of atopy is suggested to be important for BHR in patients with asthma. We aimed to assess BHR to methacholine (direct stimulus) and to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP; indirect stimulus) in preschool children with allergic rhinitis and to investigate their relationship with the degree of atopy. METHODS: Methacholine and AMP bronchial challenges were performed in preschool children with allergic rhinitis (n = 96), using a modified auscultation method. The end point concentration, resulting in audible wheezing and/or oxygen desaturation, was determined for each challenge. The degree of atopy was assessed using serum total IgE levels, the number of positive skin-prick tests, and atopic scores (sum of graded wheal size). RESULTS: BHR to methacholine (end point concentration, ≤8 mg/mL) and to AMP (end point concentration, ≤200 mg/mL) was observed in 32 (33.3%) and 26 (27.1%) subjects, respectively. No significant relationship was observed between BHR to methacholine and any atopy parameter. In contrast, the atopic scores were higher in the AMP-BHR(+) group compared with the AMP-BHR(-) group, and a significant association was found between the degree of atopic scores and the frequency of BHR to AMP (score for trend, p = 0.006). Such a relationship was not observed for serum total IgE levels and the number of positive SPTs. CONCLUSION: BHR to methacholine and BHR to AMP were detected in a significant proportion of preschool children with allergic rhinitis. The degree of atopy in terms of atopic scores seems to be an important factor for BHR to AMP but not for BHR to methacholine. SN - 1945-8932 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22186236/Bronchial_hyperresponsiveness_in_preschool_children_with_allergic_rhinitis_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.2500/ajra.2011.25.3685?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -