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Coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: findings from a large up-to-date meta-analysis.
Int J Cancer 2012; 131(7):1700-10IJ

Abstract

Several epidemiological studies have examined the association between coffee drinking and risk of endometrial cancer. To provide a quantitative assessment of this association, we conducted a meta-analysis of observational studies published up to October 2011 through a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the reference lists of retrieved article. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model, and generalized least square trend estimation was used to assess dose-response relationships. A total of 16 studies (10 case-control and six cohort studies) on coffee intake with 6,628 endometrial cancer cases were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RR of endometrial cancer for the highest versus lowest categories of coffee intake was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.62-0.81; p for heterogeneity = 0.13). By study design, the pooled RRs were 0.69 (95% CI: 0.55-0.87) for case-control studies and 0.70 (95% CI: 0.61-0.80) for cohort studies. By geographic region, the inverse association was stronger for three Japanese studies (pooled RR = 0.40; 95% CI: 0.25-0.63) than five studies from USA/Canada (pooled RR = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.60-0.79) or eight studies from Europe (pooled RR = 0.79; 95% CI: 0.63-0.99). An increment of one cup per day of coffee intake conferred a pooled RR of 0.92 (95% CI: 0.90-0.95). In conclusion, our findings suggest that increased coffee intake is associated with a reduced risk of endometrial cancer, consistently observed for cohort and case-control studies. More large studies are needed to determine subgroups to obtain more benefits from coffee drinking in relation to endometrial cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. yje@hsph.harvard.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22190017

Citation

Je, Youjin, and Edward Giovannucci. "Coffee Consumption and Risk of Endometrial Cancer: Findings From a Large Up-to-date Meta-analysis." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 131, no. 7, 2012, pp. 1700-10.
Je Y, Giovannucci E. Coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: findings from a large up-to-date meta-analysis. Int J Cancer. 2012;131(7):1700-10.
Je, Y., & Giovannucci, E. (2012). Coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: findings from a large up-to-date meta-analysis. International Journal of Cancer, 131(7), pp. 1700-10. doi:10.1002/ijc.27408.
Je Y, Giovannucci E. Coffee Consumption and Risk of Endometrial Cancer: Findings From a Large Up-to-date Meta-analysis. Int J Cancer. 2012 Oct 1;131(7):1700-10. PubMed PMID: 22190017.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: findings from a large up-to-date meta-analysis. AU - Je,Youjin, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, Y1 - 2012/01/31/ PY - 2011/10/08/received PY - 2011/12/09/accepted PY - 2011/12/23/entrez PY - 2011/12/23/pubmed PY - 2012/10/18/medline SP - 1700 EP - 10 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 131 IS - 7 N2 - Several epidemiological studies have examined the association between coffee drinking and risk of endometrial cancer. To provide a quantitative assessment of this association, we conducted a meta-analysis of observational studies published up to October 2011 through a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the reference lists of retrieved article. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model, and generalized least square trend estimation was used to assess dose-response relationships. A total of 16 studies (10 case-control and six cohort studies) on coffee intake with 6,628 endometrial cancer cases were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RR of endometrial cancer for the highest versus lowest categories of coffee intake was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.62-0.81; p for heterogeneity = 0.13). By study design, the pooled RRs were 0.69 (95% CI: 0.55-0.87) for case-control studies and 0.70 (95% CI: 0.61-0.80) for cohort studies. By geographic region, the inverse association was stronger for three Japanese studies (pooled RR = 0.40; 95% CI: 0.25-0.63) than five studies from USA/Canada (pooled RR = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.60-0.79) or eight studies from Europe (pooled RR = 0.79; 95% CI: 0.63-0.99). An increment of one cup per day of coffee intake conferred a pooled RR of 0.92 (95% CI: 0.90-0.95). In conclusion, our findings suggest that increased coffee intake is associated with a reduced risk of endometrial cancer, consistently observed for cohort and case-control studies. More large studies are needed to determine subgroups to obtain more benefits from coffee drinking in relation to endometrial cancer risk. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22190017/Coffee_consumption_and_risk_of_endometrial_cancer:_findings_from_a_large_up_to_date_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.27408 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -