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Hippocampal volume and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism in first episode psychosis.
Schizophr Res 2012; 134(2-3):253-9SR

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Small hippocampi and impaired memory are common in patients with psychosis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in hippocampal neuroplasticity and memory. A common BDNF allele (Val66Met) has been the focus of numerous studies but results from the few BDNF-imaging studies are complex and contradictory. The objective of this study was to determine the association between Val66Met and hippocampal volume in patients with first episode psychosis. Secondary analyses explored age-related associations and the relationship between Val66Met and memory.

METHOD

Hippocampal volume and BDNF genotyping were obtained for 58 patients with first-episode psychosis and 39 healthy volunteers. Patients were recruited from an early psychosis program serving a catchment-area population.

RESULTS

Hippocampal volume was significantly smaller in patients than controls (F(1,92)=4.03, p<0.05) and there was a significant group-by-allele interaction (F(1,92)=3.99, p<0.05). Hippocampal volume was significantly smaller in patients than controls who were Val-homozygotes but no group differences were found for Met carriers. Findings were not affected by diagnosis, antipsychotic medication, or age, and there was no change in hippocampal volume during a one-year follow-up. Val-homozygous patients had worse immediate and delayed memory than their Met counterparts.

CONCLUSIONS

Results suggest the effects of the BDNF Val66Met allele may be different in patients with psychosis than in healthy adults. Hippocampal volume in patient and control Met allele carriers was very similar suggesting that illness-related factors have minimal influence in this group. In contrast, Val homozygosity was related to smaller hippocampi and poorer memory functioning only in patients with psychosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. geoffsm@interchange.ubc.ca

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22192502

Citation

Smith, Geoffrey N., et al. "Hippocampal Volume and the Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Val66Met Polymorphism in First Episode Psychosis." Schizophrenia Research, vol. 134, no. 2-3, 2012, pp. 253-9.
Smith GN, Thornton AE, Lang DJ, et al. Hippocampal volume and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism in first episode psychosis. Schizophr Res. 2012;134(2-3):253-9.
Smith, G. N., Thornton, A. E., Lang, D. J., Macewan, G. W., Ehmann, T. S., Kopala, L. C., ... Honer, W. G. (2012). Hippocampal volume and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism in first episode psychosis. Schizophrenia Research, 134(2-3), pp. 253-9. doi:10.1016/j.schres.2011.11.022.
Smith GN, et al. Hippocampal Volume and the Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Val66Met Polymorphism in First Episode Psychosis. Schizophr Res. 2012;134(2-3):253-9. PubMed PMID: 22192502.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hippocampal volume and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism in first episode psychosis. AU - Smith,Geoffrey N, AU - Thornton,Allen E, AU - Lang,Donna J, AU - Macewan,G William, AU - Ehmann,Thomas S, AU - Kopala,Lili C, AU - Tee,Karen, AU - Shiau,Gillian, AU - Voineskos,Aristotle N, AU - Kennedy,James L, AU - Honer,William G, Y1 - 2011/12/21/ PY - 2011/08/16/received PY - 2011/11/14/revised PY - 2011/11/16/accepted PY - 2011/12/24/entrez PY - 2011/12/24/pubmed PY - 2012/6/5/medline SP - 253 EP - 9 JF - Schizophrenia research JO - Schizophr. Res. VL - 134 IS - 2-3 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Small hippocampi and impaired memory are common in patients with psychosis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in hippocampal neuroplasticity and memory. A common BDNF allele (Val66Met) has been the focus of numerous studies but results from the few BDNF-imaging studies are complex and contradictory. The objective of this study was to determine the association between Val66Met and hippocampal volume in patients with first episode psychosis. Secondary analyses explored age-related associations and the relationship between Val66Met and memory. METHOD: Hippocampal volume and BDNF genotyping were obtained for 58 patients with first-episode psychosis and 39 healthy volunteers. Patients were recruited from an early psychosis program serving a catchment-area population. RESULTS: Hippocampal volume was significantly smaller in patients than controls (F(1,92)=4.03, p<0.05) and there was a significant group-by-allele interaction (F(1,92)=3.99, p<0.05). Hippocampal volume was significantly smaller in patients than controls who were Val-homozygotes but no group differences were found for Met carriers. Findings were not affected by diagnosis, antipsychotic medication, or age, and there was no change in hippocampal volume during a one-year follow-up. Val-homozygous patients had worse immediate and delayed memory than their Met counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest the effects of the BDNF Val66Met allele may be different in patients with psychosis than in healthy adults. Hippocampal volume in patient and control Met allele carriers was very similar suggesting that illness-related factors have minimal influence in this group. In contrast, Val homozygosity was related to smaller hippocampi and poorer memory functioning only in patients with psychosis. SN - 1573-2509 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22192502/Hippocampal_volume_and_the_brain_derived_neurotrophic_factor_Val66Met_polymorphism_in_first_episode_psychosis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0920-9964(11)00620-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -