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Effect of different protein sources on satiation and short-term satiety when consumed as a starter.
Nutr J 2011; 10:139NJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Because the source of protein may play a role in its satiating effect, we investigated the effect of different proteins on satiation and short-term satiety.

METHODS

Two randomized single-blind cross-over studies were completed. In the first study, we investigated the effect of a preload containing 20 g of casein, whey, pea protein, egg albumin or maltodextrin vs. water control on food intake 30 min later in 32 male volunteers (25 ± 4 yrs, BMI 24 ± 0.4 kg/m(2)). Subjective appetite was assessed using visual analogue scales at 10 min intervals after the preload. Capillary blood glucose was measured every 30 min during 2 hrs before and after the ad libitum meal. In the second study, we compared the effect of 20 g of casein, pea protein or whey vs. water control on satiation in 32 male volunteers (25 ± 0.6 yrs, BMI 24 ± 0.5 kg/m(2)). The preload was consumed as a starter during an ad libitum meal and food intake was measured. The preloads in both studies were in the form of a beverage.

RESULTS

In the first study, food intake was significantly lower only after casein and pea protein compared to water control (P = 0.02; 0.04 respectively). Caloric compensation was 110, 103, 62, 56 and 51% after casein, pea protein, whey, albumin and maltodextrin, respectively. Feelings of satiety were significantly higher after casein and pea protein compared to other preloads (P < 0.05). Blood glucose response to the meal was significantly lower when whey protein was consumed as a preload compared to other groups (P < 0.001). In the second study, results showed no difference between preloads on ad libitum intake. Total intake was significantly higher after caloric preloads compared to water control (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

Casein and pea protein showed a stronger effect on food intake compared to whey when consumed as a preload. However, consuming the protein preload as a starter of a meal decreased its impact on food intake as opposed to consuming it 30 min before the meal.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nestlé Research Center, Nestec Ltd, Lausanne, Switzerland. rania.abousamra@rdls.nestle.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22196620

Citation

Abou-Samra, Rania, et al. "Effect of Different Protein Sources On Satiation and Short-term Satiety when Consumed as a Starter." Nutrition Journal, vol. 10, 2011, p. 139.
Abou-Samra R, Keersmaekers L, Brienza D, et al. Effect of different protein sources on satiation and short-term satiety when consumed as a starter. Nutr J. 2011;10:139.
Abou-Samra, R., Keersmaekers, L., Brienza, D., Mukherjee, R., & Macé, K. (2011). Effect of different protein sources on satiation and short-term satiety when consumed as a starter. Nutrition Journal, 10, p. 139. doi:10.1186/1475-2891-10-139.
Abou-Samra R, et al. Effect of Different Protein Sources On Satiation and Short-term Satiety when Consumed as a Starter. Nutr J. 2011 Dec 23;10:139. PubMed PMID: 22196620.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of different protein sources on satiation and short-term satiety when consumed as a starter. AU - Abou-Samra,Rania, AU - Keersmaekers,Lian, AU - Brienza,Dino, AU - Mukherjee,Rajat, AU - Macé,Katherine, Y1 - 2011/12/23/ PY - 2011/07/08/received PY - 2011/12/23/accepted PY - 2011/12/27/entrez PY - 2011/12/27/pubmed PY - 2012/5/26/medline SP - 139 EP - 139 JF - Nutrition journal JO - Nutr J VL - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Because the source of protein may play a role in its satiating effect, we investigated the effect of different proteins on satiation and short-term satiety. METHODS: Two randomized single-blind cross-over studies were completed. In the first study, we investigated the effect of a preload containing 20 g of casein, whey, pea protein, egg albumin or maltodextrin vs. water control on food intake 30 min later in 32 male volunteers (25 ± 4 yrs, BMI 24 ± 0.4 kg/m(2)). Subjective appetite was assessed using visual analogue scales at 10 min intervals after the preload. Capillary blood glucose was measured every 30 min during 2 hrs before and after the ad libitum meal. In the second study, we compared the effect of 20 g of casein, pea protein or whey vs. water control on satiation in 32 male volunteers (25 ± 0.6 yrs, BMI 24 ± 0.5 kg/m(2)). The preload was consumed as a starter during an ad libitum meal and food intake was measured. The preloads in both studies were in the form of a beverage. RESULTS: In the first study, food intake was significantly lower only after casein and pea protein compared to water control (P = 0.02; 0.04 respectively). Caloric compensation was 110, 103, 62, 56 and 51% after casein, pea protein, whey, albumin and maltodextrin, respectively. Feelings of satiety were significantly higher after casein and pea protein compared to other preloads (P < 0.05). Blood glucose response to the meal was significantly lower when whey protein was consumed as a preload compared to other groups (P < 0.001). In the second study, results showed no difference between preloads on ad libitum intake. Total intake was significantly higher after caloric preloads compared to water control (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Casein and pea protein showed a stronger effect on food intake compared to whey when consumed as a preload. However, consuming the protein preload as a starter of a meal decreased its impact on food intake as opposed to consuming it 30 min before the meal. SN - 1475-2891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22196620/Effect_of_different_protein_sources_on_satiation_and_short_term_satiety_when_consumed_as_a_starter_ L2 - https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-10-139 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -