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Repeated exposure to effort-reward imbalance, increased blood pressure, and hypertension incidence among white-collar workers: effort-reward imbalance and blood pressure.
J Psychosom Res 2012; 72(1):26-32JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine whether men and women with repeated ERI exposure have increased BP means or higher hypertension incidence over a 3-year follow-up. To examine the potential modifying effect of age and overcommitment.

METHODS

The study cohort was composed of 1,595 white-collar workers (629 men and 966 women) assessed at baseline and 3-year follow-up. Ambulatory BP measures were taken every 15 min during a working day. ERI at work was self-reported using validated scales. BP means at follow-up and cumulative incidence of hypertension were respectively modeled with analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) and log-binomial regression.

RESULTS

Among men, no association was observed between repeated ERI exposure and BP. Among women, age had a modifying effect. Women <45 years old exposed to ERI at both times had significantly higher BP means at follow-up (122.2/78.9 mmHg) than those unexposed (120.4/77.4 mmHg). In women ≥45 years old, the cumulative incidence of hypertension was 2.78 (95% CI: 1.26-6.10) times higher among those exposed to ERI at both times. Men and women in the higher tertile of overcommitment had higher BP means (men: 128.9/82.2 mmHg, women: 121.9/78.0 mmHg) than those in the lower tertile (men: 127.2/81.3 mmHg, women: 120.6/77.0 mmHg).

CONCLUSION

This prospective study showed that, among women, repeated ERI exposure led to a significant age-specific increase in BP means and a major age-specific increase in hypertension incidence. These results suggest that primary intervention aimed at reducing ERI may contribute to lower BP and prevent hypertension in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Santé des Populations: URESP, Centre de Recherche FRSQ du Centre Hospitalier affilié Universitaire de Quebec City, Québec, Canada. mahee.g.ouimet@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22200519

Citation

Gilbert-Ouimet, M, et al. "Repeated Exposure to Effort-reward Imbalance, Increased Blood Pressure, and Hypertension Incidence Among White-collar Workers: Effort-reward Imbalance and Blood Pressure." Journal of Psychosomatic Research, vol. 72, no. 1, 2012, pp. 26-32.
Gilbert-Ouimet M, Brisson C, Vézina M, et al. Repeated exposure to effort-reward imbalance, increased blood pressure, and hypertension incidence among white-collar workers: effort-reward imbalance and blood pressure. J Psychosom Res. 2012;72(1):26-32.
Gilbert-Ouimet, M., Brisson, C., Vézina, M., Milot, A., & Blanchette, C. (2012). Repeated exposure to effort-reward imbalance, increased blood pressure, and hypertension incidence among white-collar workers: effort-reward imbalance and blood pressure. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 72(1), pp. 26-32. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychores.2011.07.002.
Gilbert-Ouimet M, et al. Repeated Exposure to Effort-reward Imbalance, Increased Blood Pressure, and Hypertension Incidence Among White-collar Workers: Effort-reward Imbalance and Blood Pressure. J Psychosom Res. 2012;72(1):26-32. PubMed PMID: 22200519.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Repeated exposure to effort-reward imbalance, increased blood pressure, and hypertension incidence among white-collar workers: effort-reward imbalance and blood pressure. AU - Gilbert-Ouimet,M, AU - Brisson,C, AU - Vézina,M, AU - Milot,A, AU - Blanchette,C, Y1 - 2011/09/10/ PY - 2010/06/28/received PY - 2011/06/20/revised PY - 2011/07/31/accepted PY - 2011/12/28/entrez PY - 2011/12/28/pubmed PY - 2012/5/5/medline SP - 26 EP - 32 JF - Journal of psychosomatic research JO - J Psychosom Res VL - 72 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine whether men and women with repeated ERI exposure have increased BP means or higher hypertension incidence over a 3-year follow-up. To examine the potential modifying effect of age and overcommitment. METHODS: The study cohort was composed of 1,595 white-collar workers (629 men and 966 women) assessed at baseline and 3-year follow-up. Ambulatory BP measures were taken every 15 min during a working day. ERI at work was self-reported using validated scales. BP means at follow-up and cumulative incidence of hypertension were respectively modeled with analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) and log-binomial regression. RESULTS: Among men, no association was observed between repeated ERI exposure and BP. Among women, age had a modifying effect. Women <45 years old exposed to ERI at both times had significantly higher BP means at follow-up (122.2/78.9 mmHg) than those unexposed (120.4/77.4 mmHg). In women ≥45 years old, the cumulative incidence of hypertension was 2.78 (95% CI: 1.26-6.10) times higher among those exposed to ERI at both times. Men and women in the higher tertile of overcommitment had higher BP means (men: 128.9/82.2 mmHg, women: 121.9/78.0 mmHg) than those in the lower tertile (men: 127.2/81.3 mmHg, women: 120.6/77.0 mmHg). CONCLUSION: This prospective study showed that, among women, repeated ERI exposure led to a significant age-specific increase in BP means and a major age-specific increase in hypertension incidence. These results suggest that primary intervention aimed at reducing ERI may contribute to lower BP and prevent hypertension in women. SN - 1879-1360 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22200519/Repeated_exposure_to_effort_reward_imbalance_increased_blood_pressure_and_hypertension_incidence_among_white_collar_workers:_effort_reward_imbalance_and_blood_pressure_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3999(11)00209-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -