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Behavioral and characterological self-blame in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
J Psychosom Res 2012; 72(1):78-83JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess behavioral and characterological self-blame, identify demographic and relational correlates of self-blame, and determine the association of self-blame with psychological and clinical outcomes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

METHODS

Data were collected via self-report questionnaires completed by 398 individuals with COPD who had at least a 10 pack-year history of smoking. Behavioral and characterological self-blame were measured, and multiple regression was used to identify correlates of both types of self-blame. Multiple regression was also used to determine the association of self-blame with outcomes of COPD.

RESULTS

More than one-third of participants endorsed the maximum possible score on the measure of behavioral self-blame. The perception that family members blamed the individual for having COPD (p=.001), tobacco exposure (p=.005), and general family functioning (p=.002) were associated with behavioral self-blame. Current smoking status (p=.001) and perception of blame from family (p<.001) were associated with characterological self-blame. While behavioral self-blame was associated with fewer symptoms of depression (p=.02), characterological self-blame was associated with more symptoms of depression (p=.02).

CONCLUSIONS

Individuals with COPD tend to blame themselves for smoking and other behaviors that may have led to their COPD. Smoking-related variables and the perception that family members blamed the individual for having COPD were associated with self-blame. Findings support the importance of distinguishing between behavioral and characterological self-blame in COPD, as behavioral self-blame had a negative association with depression and characterological self-blame had a positive association with depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO 80206, United States.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22200527

Citation

Plaufcan, Melissa R., et al. "Behavioral and Characterological Self-blame in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease." Journal of Psychosomatic Research, vol. 72, no. 1, 2012, pp. 78-83.
Plaufcan MR, Wamboldt FS, Holm KE. Behavioral and characterological self-blame in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. J Psychosom Res. 2012;72(1):78-83.
Plaufcan, M. R., Wamboldt, F. S., & Holm, K. E. (2012). Behavioral and characterological self-blame in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 72(1), pp. 78-83. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychores.2011.10.004.
Plaufcan MR, Wamboldt FS, Holm KE. Behavioral and Characterological Self-blame in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. J Psychosom Res. 2012;72(1):78-83. PubMed PMID: 22200527.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Behavioral and characterological self-blame in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. AU - Plaufcan,Melissa R, AU - Wamboldt,Frederick S, AU - Holm,Kristen E, Y1 - 2011/12/07/ PY - 2010/10/27/received PY - 2011/10/06/revised PY - 2011/10/14/accepted PY - 2011/12/28/entrez PY - 2011/12/28/pubmed PY - 2012/5/5/medline SP - 78 EP - 83 JF - Journal of psychosomatic research JO - J Psychosom Res VL - 72 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess behavioral and characterological self-blame, identify demographic and relational correlates of self-blame, and determine the association of self-blame with psychological and clinical outcomes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: Data were collected via self-report questionnaires completed by 398 individuals with COPD who had at least a 10 pack-year history of smoking. Behavioral and characterological self-blame were measured, and multiple regression was used to identify correlates of both types of self-blame. Multiple regression was also used to determine the association of self-blame with outcomes of COPD. RESULTS: More than one-third of participants endorsed the maximum possible score on the measure of behavioral self-blame. The perception that family members blamed the individual for having COPD (p=.001), tobacco exposure (p=.005), and general family functioning (p=.002) were associated with behavioral self-blame. Current smoking status (p=.001) and perception of blame from family (p<.001) were associated with characterological self-blame. While behavioral self-blame was associated with fewer symptoms of depression (p=.02), characterological self-blame was associated with more symptoms of depression (p=.02). CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with COPD tend to blame themselves for smoking and other behaviors that may have led to their COPD. Smoking-related variables and the perception that family members blamed the individual for having COPD were associated with self-blame. Findings support the importance of distinguishing between behavioral and characterological self-blame in COPD, as behavioral self-blame had a negative association with depression and characterological self-blame had a positive association with depression. SN - 1879-1360 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22200527/Behavioral_and_characterological_self_blame_in_chronic_obstructive_pulmonary_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3999(11)00271-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -