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What is common becomes normal: the effect of obesity prevalence on maternal perception.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 May; 23(5):410-6.NM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

This analysis investigates the poorly-known effect of local prevalence of childhood obesity on mothers' perception of their children's weight status.

METHODS AND RESULTS

In 2008, a national nutritional survey of children attending the third grade of elementary school was conducted in Italy. Children were measured and classified as underweight, normal weight, overweight and obese, using the International Obesity Task Force cut-offs for body mass index (BMI). A parental questionnaire included parental perception of their child's weight status (underweight, normal, a little overweight and a lot overweight). Regions were classified by childhood obesity prevalence (<8%, 8-12%, ≥13%). The association between incorrect maternal perception and regional obesity prevalence, and maternal and child characteristics were examined using bivariate and logistic regression analyses. Complete data were available for 37 590 children, of whom 24% were overweight and 12% obese. Mothers correctly identified the status of 84% of normal weight, 52% of overweight and 14% of obese children. Among overweight children, factors associated with underestimation of the child's weight included lower maternal education (adjusted odds ratio, aOR, 1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-2.4), residence in a high-obesity region (aOR 2.2; 95% CI 1.9-2.6), male gender (aOR 1.4; 95% CI 1.2-1.6) and child's BMI.

CONCLUSION

Higher regional obesity prevalence is associated with lower maternal perception, suggesting that what is common has a greater likelihood of being perceived as normal. As perception is a first step to change, it may be harder to intervene in areas with high-obesity prevalence where intervention is most urgent.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Centre for Epidemiology, Surveillance, and Health Promotion, Istituto Superiore di Sanità (National Institute of Health), Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome, Italy. nancy.binkin3@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22212600

Citation

Binkin, N, et al. "What Is Common Becomes Normal: the Effect of Obesity Prevalence On Maternal Perception." Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, vol. 23, no. 5, 2013, pp. 410-6.
Binkin N, Spinelli A, Baglio G, et al. What is common becomes normal: the effect of obesity prevalence on maternal perception. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013;23(5):410-6.
Binkin, N., Spinelli, A., Baglio, G., & Lamberti, A. (2013). What is common becomes normal: the effect of obesity prevalence on maternal perception. Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, 23(5), 410-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2011.09.006
Binkin N, et al. What Is Common Becomes Normal: the Effect of Obesity Prevalence On Maternal Perception. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013;23(5):410-6. PubMed PMID: 22212600.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - What is common becomes normal: the effect of obesity prevalence on maternal perception. AU - Binkin,N, AU - Spinelli,A, AU - Baglio,G, AU - Lamberti,A, Y1 - 2011/12/31/ PY - 2010/12/30/received PY - 2011/09/09/revised PY - 2011/09/12/accepted PY - 2012/1/4/entrez PY - 2012/1/4/pubmed PY - 2014/1/3/medline SP - 410 EP - 6 JF - Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD JO - Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis VL - 23 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: This analysis investigates the poorly-known effect of local prevalence of childhood obesity on mothers' perception of their children's weight status. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 2008, a national nutritional survey of children attending the third grade of elementary school was conducted in Italy. Children were measured and classified as underweight, normal weight, overweight and obese, using the International Obesity Task Force cut-offs for body mass index (BMI). A parental questionnaire included parental perception of their child's weight status (underweight, normal, a little overweight and a lot overweight). Regions were classified by childhood obesity prevalence (<8%, 8-12%, ≥13%). The association between incorrect maternal perception and regional obesity prevalence, and maternal and child characteristics were examined using bivariate and logistic regression analyses. Complete data were available for 37 590 children, of whom 24% were overweight and 12% obese. Mothers correctly identified the status of 84% of normal weight, 52% of overweight and 14% of obese children. Among overweight children, factors associated with underestimation of the child's weight included lower maternal education (adjusted odds ratio, aOR, 1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-2.4), residence in a high-obesity region (aOR 2.2; 95% CI 1.9-2.6), male gender (aOR 1.4; 95% CI 1.2-1.6) and child's BMI. CONCLUSION: Higher regional obesity prevalence is associated with lower maternal perception, suggesting that what is common has a greater likelihood of being perceived as normal. As perception is a first step to change, it may be harder to intervene in areas with high-obesity prevalence where intervention is most urgent. SN - 1590-3729 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22212600/What_is_common_becomes_normal:_the_effect_of_obesity_prevalence_on_maternal_perception_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0939-4753(11)00220-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -