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Lower-body work capacity and one-repetition maximum squat prediction in college football players.
J Strength Cond Res. 2012 Feb; 26(2):364-72.JS

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess lower-body muscular strength and work capacity after off-season resistance training and the efficacy of predicting maximal squat strength (1 repetition maximum [1RM]) from repetitions to fatigue. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division-II football players (n = 58) were divided into low-strength (LS, 1RM < 365 lb, n = 32) and high-strength (HS, 1RM ≥ 365 lb, n = 26) groups before training based on median 1RM squat performance. Maximal repetitions to failure (RTFs) were performed with a relative load of 70% of 1RM before training and 60, 70, 80, and 90% of 1RM after 12 weeks of a linear periodization resistance training program. As a team, 1RM squat (32 ± 27 lb), 70% RTF (4.5 ± 4.5 reps), and work capacity at 70% 1RM load (1,482 ± 1,181 lb reps) increased significantly after training. Likewise, training resulted in significant increases in 1RM, RTF at 70% 1RM, and work capacity (load × reps) in both LS (8 ± 33 lb, 3.9 ± 4.7 reps, 1,736 ± 1,521 lb reps, respectively) and HS (27 ± 21 lb, 4.9 ± 4.4 reps, 2,387 ± 1,767 lb reps, respectively), with no significant difference between groups. There was no relationship between the change in work capacity and the change in muscular strength for either the LS (r = 0.02) or HS (r = 0.06) group. Predicted 1RMs were best when RTFs were performed using 80% 1RM (5-17 RTFs), with an error of ±5% in 95% of the subjects. In conclusion, the changes in muscular strength associated with an off-season training program appear to have a positive influence on squat work capacity at 70% of 1RM and allow favorable prediction of 1RM using submaximal loads.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physical Education, Center for Physical Development Excellence, United States Military Academy, West Point, New York, USA. bill.brechue@usma.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22233793

Citation

Brechue, William F., and Jerry L. Mayhew. "Lower-body Work Capacity and One-repetition Maximum Squat Prediction in College Football Players." Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 26, no. 2, 2012, pp. 364-72.
Brechue WF, Mayhew JL. Lower-body work capacity and one-repetition maximum squat prediction in college football players. J Strength Cond Res. 2012;26(2):364-72.
Brechue, W. F., & Mayhew, J. L. (2012). Lower-body work capacity and one-repetition maximum squat prediction in college football players. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 26(2), 364-72. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e318225eee3
Brechue WF, Mayhew JL. Lower-body Work Capacity and One-repetition Maximum Squat Prediction in College Football Players. J Strength Cond Res. 2012;26(2):364-72. PubMed PMID: 22233793.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lower-body work capacity and one-repetition maximum squat prediction in college football players. AU - Brechue,William F, AU - Mayhew,Jerry L, PY - 2012/1/12/entrez PY - 2012/1/12/pubmed PY - 2012/5/23/medline SP - 364 EP - 72 JF - Journal of strength and conditioning research JO - J Strength Cond Res VL - 26 IS - 2 N2 - The purpose of this study was to assess lower-body muscular strength and work capacity after off-season resistance training and the efficacy of predicting maximal squat strength (1 repetition maximum [1RM]) from repetitions to fatigue. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division-II football players (n = 58) were divided into low-strength (LS, 1RM < 365 lb, n = 32) and high-strength (HS, 1RM ≥ 365 lb, n = 26) groups before training based on median 1RM squat performance. Maximal repetitions to failure (RTFs) were performed with a relative load of 70% of 1RM before training and 60, 70, 80, and 90% of 1RM after 12 weeks of a linear periodization resistance training program. As a team, 1RM squat (32 ± 27 lb), 70% RTF (4.5 ± 4.5 reps), and work capacity at 70% 1RM load (1,482 ± 1,181 lb reps) increased significantly after training. Likewise, training resulted in significant increases in 1RM, RTF at 70% 1RM, and work capacity (load × reps) in both LS (8 ± 33 lb, 3.9 ± 4.7 reps, 1,736 ± 1,521 lb reps, respectively) and HS (27 ± 21 lb, 4.9 ± 4.4 reps, 2,387 ± 1,767 lb reps, respectively), with no significant difference between groups. There was no relationship between the change in work capacity and the change in muscular strength for either the LS (r = 0.02) or HS (r = 0.06) group. Predicted 1RMs were best when RTFs were performed using 80% 1RM (5-17 RTFs), with an error of ±5% in 95% of the subjects. In conclusion, the changes in muscular strength associated with an off-season training program appear to have a positive influence on squat work capacity at 70% of 1RM and allow favorable prediction of 1RM using submaximal loads. SN - 1533-4287 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22233793/Lower_body_work_capacity_and_one_repetition_maximum_squat_prediction_in_college_football_players_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e318225eee3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -