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Use of mini-monoka stents for punctal/canalicular stenosis.
Br J Ophthalmol. 2012 May; 96(5):671-3.BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Proximal lacrimal system stenosis may cause debilitating epiphora and recurrent ocular infections. Mini-monoka stents are primarily used in the management of canalicular lacerations. Evidence regarding their use to treat punctal/canalicular stenosis is sparse. Compared with dacryocystorhinostomy, a punctocanaliculoplasty with mini-monoka stenting is quicker, less invasive with reduced postoperative complications/recovery time.

AIMS

To assess the effectiveness of mini-monoka punctocanaliculoplasty for treatment of punctal/canalicular stenosis.

METHODS

A retrospective case note analysis was performed on 77 consecutive patients (123 eyes).

RESULTS

73% of eyes had punctal stenosis, 72% had canalicular stenosis; 46% had a combination of the above. 20% had some degree of lid laxity and 29% had nasolacrimal duct stenosis. 101 eyes (82%) had significant improvement in symptoms and were discharged without further intervention. Excluding the patients with structural comorbidity the success rate improved to 88%.

CONCLUSIONS

Mini-monoka punctocanaliculoplasty is an effective, safe, simple and relatively non-invasive treatment strategy for the management of epiphora secondary to punctal and/or canalicular stenosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Infirmary Square, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK. rumanahussain@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22241928

Citation

Hussain, R N., et al. "Use of Mini-monoka Stents for Punctal/canalicular Stenosis." The British Journal of Ophthalmology, vol. 96, no. 5, 2012, pp. 671-3.
Hussain RN, Kanani H, McMullan T. Use of mini-monoka stents for punctal/canalicular stenosis. Br J Ophthalmol. 2012;96(5):671-3.
Hussain, R. N., Kanani, H., & McMullan, T. (2012). Use of mini-monoka stents for punctal/canalicular stenosis. The British Journal of Ophthalmology, 96(5), 671-3. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjophthalmol-2011-300670
Hussain RN, Kanani H, McMullan T. Use of Mini-monoka Stents for Punctal/canalicular Stenosis. Br J Ophthalmol. 2012;96(5):671-3. PubMed PMID: 22241928.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of mini-monoka stents for punctal/canalicular stenosis. AU - Hussain,R N, AU - Kanani,H, AU - McMullan,T, Y1 - 2012/01/12/ PY - 2012/1/14/entrez PY - 2012/1/14/pubmed PY - 2012/6/7/medline SP - 671 EP - 3 JF - The British journal of ophthalmology JO - Br J Ophthalmol VL - 96 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Proximal lacrimal system stenosis may cause debilitating epiphora and recurrent ocular infections. Mini-monoka stents are primarily used in the management of canalicular lacerations. Evidence regarding their use to treat punctal/canalicular stenosis is sparse. Compared with dacryocystorhinostomy, a punctocanaliculoplasty with mini-monoka stenting is quicker, less invasive with reduced postoperative complications/recovery time. AIMS: To assess the effectiveness of mini-monoka punctocanaliculoplasty for treatment of punctal/canalicular stenosis. METHODS: A retrospective case note analysis was performed on 77 consecutive patients (123 eyes). RESULTS: 73% of eyes had punctal stenosis, 72% had canalicular stenosis; 46% had a combination of the above. 20% had some degree of lid laxity and 29% had nasolacrimal duct stenosis. 101 eyes (82%) had significant improvement in symptoms and were discharged without further intervention. Excluding the patients with structural comorbidity the success rate improved to 88%. CONCLUSIONS: Mini-monoka punctocanaliculoplasty is an effective, safe, simple and relatively non-invasive treatment strategy for the management of epiphora secondary to punctal and/or canalicular stenosis. SN - 1468-2079 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22241928/Use_of_mini_monoka_stents_for_punctal/canalicular_stenosis_ L2 - http://bjo.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=22241928 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -