Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status and metabolic syndrome: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract 2012; 96(3):400-6DR

Abstract

AIMS

To investigate sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Korean adults.

METHODS

We examined the relationship between SES, as measured by household income or education level, and the prevalence of MetS in Korean adults who participated in the 2007-2008 Korean National Health Examination and Nutrition Survey (KNHANES). The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for MetS were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis across household income and education level quartiles.

RESULTS

We found significant differences between men and women in the association between SES and MetS, with a positive association for men and an inverse association for women. The adjusted OR and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for MetS for the highest vs. lowest quartile of household income was 1.59 (1.15-2.20) in men. The adjusted ORs for MetS for the highest vs. lowest quartile of household income and education level were 0.54 (0.41-0.72) and 0.26 (0.17-0.38) in women, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

We found sex differences in the relationship between SES and the prevalence of MetS in Korea. These findings suggest that sex-specific public health interventions that consider SES are needed for the prevention and treatment of MetS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22245695

Citation

Park, So-Jung, et al. "Sex Differences in the Relationship Between Socioeconomic Status and Metabolic Syndrome: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey." Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, vol. 96, no. 3, 2012, pp. 400-6.
Park SJ, Kang HT, Nam CM, et al. Sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status and metabolic syndrome: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2012;96(3):400-6.
Park, S. J., Kang, H. T., Nam, C. M., Park, B. J., Linton, J. A., & Lee, Y. J. (2012). Sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status and metabolic syndrome: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 96(3), pp. 400-6. doi:10.1016/j.diabres.2011.12.025.
Park SJ, et al. Sex Differences in the Relationship Between Socioeconomic Status and Metabolic Syndrome: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2012;96(3):400-6. PubMed PMID: 22245695.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status and metabolic syndrome: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. AU - Park,So-Jung, AU - Kang,Hee-Taik, AU - Nam,Chung-Mo, AU - Park,Byoung-Jin, AU - Linton,John A, AU - Lee,Yong-Jae, Y1 - 2012/01/15/ PY - 2011/10/31/received PY - 2011/12/08/revised PY - 2011/12/15/accepted PY - 2012/1/17/entrez PY - 2012/1/17/pubmed PY - 2012/10/20/medline SP - 400 EP - 6 JF - Diabetes research and clinical practice JO - Diabetes Res. Clin. Pract. VL - 96 IS - 3 N2 - AIMS: To investigate sex differences in the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Korean adults. METHODS: We examined the relationship between SES, as measured by household income or education level, and the prevalence of MetS in Korean adults who participated in the 2007-2008 Korean National Health Examination and Nutrition Survey (KNHANES). The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for MetS were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis across household income and education level quartiles. RESULTS: We found significant differences between men and women in the association between SES and MetS, with a positive association for men and an inverse association for women. The adjusted OR and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for MetS for the highest vs. lowest quartile of household income was 1.59 (1.15-2.20) in men. The adjusted ORs for MetS for the highest vs. lowest quartile of household income and education level were 0.54 (0.41-0.72) and 0.26 (0.17-0.38) in women, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We found sex differences in the relationship between SES and the prevalence of MetS in Korea. These findings suggest that sex-specific public health interventions that consider SES are needed for the prevention and treatment of MetS. SN - 1872-8227 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22245695/Sex_differences_in_the_relationship_between_socioeconomic_status_and_metabolic_syndrome:_the_Korean_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0168-8227(11)00707-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -