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Bioavailability of coffee chlorogenic acids and green tea flavan-3-ols.
Nutrients. 2010 08; 2(8):820-33.N

Abstract

This paper reviews recent human studies on the bioavailability of chlorogenic acids in coffee and green tea flavan-3-ols in which the identification of metabolites, catabolites and parent compounds in plasma, urine and ileal fluid was based on mass spectrometric methodology. Both the chlorogenic acids and the flavan-3-ols are absorbed in the small intestine and appear in the circulatory system predominantly as glucuronide, sulfate and methylated metabolites. Even when absorption occurs in the small intestine, feeding studies with ileostomists reveal that substantial amounts of the parent compounds and some of their metabolites appear in ileal fluid indicating that in volunteers with a functioning colon these compounds will pass to the large intestine where they are subjected to the action of the colonic microflora. A diversity of colonic-derived catabolites are absorbed into the bloodstream and pass through the body prior to excretion in urine. There is growing evidence that these compounds, which were little investigated until recently, are produced in quantity in the colon and form a key part of the bioavailability equation of flavonoids and related compounds that occur in fruits, vegetables and beverages. Recent evidence indicates that some colon-derived phenolic acids have in vitro anti-inflammatory activity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Nutrition Unit, Department of Public Health, University of Parma, Via Volturno 39, 43100 Parma, Italy. daniele.delrio@unipr.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22254058

Citation

Del Rio, Daniele, et al. "Bioavailability of Coffee Chlorogenic Acids and Green Tea Flavan-3-ols." Nutrients, vol. 2, no. 8, 2010, pp. 820-33.
Del Rio D, Stalmach A, Calani L, et al. Bioavailability of coffee chlorogenic acids and green tea flavan-3-ols. Nutrients. 2010;2(8):820-33.
Del Rio, D., Stalmach, A., Calani, L., & Crozier, A. (2010). Bioavailability of coffee chlorogenic acids and green tea flavan-3-ols. Nutrients, 2(8), 820-33. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu2080820
Del Rio D, et al. Bioavailability of Coffee Chlorogenic Acids and Green Tea Flavan-3-ols. Nutrients. 2010;2(8):820-33. PubMed PMID: 22254058.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bioavailability of coffee chlorogenic acids and green tea flavan-3-ols. AU - Del Rio,Daniele, AU - Stalmach,Angelique, AU - Calani,Luca, AU - Crozier,Alan, Y1 - 2010/07/29/ PY - 2010/07/05/received PY - 2010/07/27/revised PY - 2010/07/28/accepted PY - 2012/1/19/entrez PY - 2010/8/1/pubmed PY - 2012/4/26/medline KW - chlorogenic acids KW - coffee KW - flavan-3-ols KW - green tea KW - human bioavailability SP - 820 EP - 33 JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 2 IS - 8 N2 - This paper reviews recent human studies on the bioavailability of chlorogenic acids in coffee and green tea flavan-3-ols in which the identification of metabolites, catabolites and parent compounds in plasma, urine and ileal fluid was based on mass spectrometric methodology. Both the chlorogenic acids and the flavan-3-ols are absorbed in the small intestine and appear in the circulatory system predominantly as glucuronide, sulfate and methylated metabolites. Even when absorption occurs in the small intestine, feeding studies with ileostomists reveal that substantial amounts of the parent compounds and some of their metabolites appear in ileal fluid indicating that in volunteers with a functioning colon these compounds will pass to the large intestine where they are subjected to the action of the colonic microflora. A diversity of colonic-derived catabolites are absorbed into the bloodstream and pass through the body prior to excretion in urine. There is growing evidence that these compounds, which were little investigated until recently, are produced in quantity in the colon and form a key part of the bioavailability equation of flavonoids and related compounds that occur in fruits, vegetables and beverages. Recent evidence indicates that some colon-derived phenolic acids have in vitro anti-inflammatory activity. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22254058/Bioavailability_of_coffee_chlorogenic_acids_and_green_tea_flavan_3_ols_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu2080820 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -