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Dietary intakes of zinc and heme iron from red meat, but not from other sources, are associated with greater risk of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease.
J Nutr 2012; 142(3):526-33JN

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome (MetS), Type 2 diabetes (T2D), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) share an inflammatory etiology and are known to be influenced by diet. We investigated associations of hypothesized prooxidative (Fe) and antioxidative (Zn, Mg, β-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E) micronutrients with incident MetS, T2D, and CVD in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Participants, 45-84 y at baseline (2000-2002), were followed through 2010. Diet was assessed by FFQ. After adjusting for demographics and behavioral confounders, including BMI, dietary vitamin E intake was inversely associated with incident MetS and CVD [HR for extreme quintiles: MetS = 0.78 (95% CI = 0.62, 0.97), P-trend = 0.01; CVD: HR = 0.69 (95% CI = 0.46, 1.03), P-trend = 0.04]. Intakes of heme iron and Zn from red meat, but not from other sources, were positively associated with risk of MetS [heme iron from red meat: HR = 1.25 (95% CI = 0.99,1.56), P-trend = 0.03; Zn from red meat: HR = 1.29 (95% CI = 1.03,1.61), P-trend = 0.04] and CVD [heme iron from red meat: HR = 1.65 (95% CI = 1.10,2.47), P-trend = 0.01; Zn from red meat: HR = 1.51 (95% CI = 1.02, 2.24), P-trend = 0.01]. Dietary intakes of nonheme iron, Mg, vitamin C, and β-carotene were not associated with risk of MetS, T2D, or CVD. Data provided little support for the associations between specific micronutrients and MetS, T2D, or CVD. However, nutrients consumed in red meat, or red meat as a whole, may increase risk of MetS and CVD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and EnvFemental Sciences, the University of Texas Health Sciences Center-Houston, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22259193

Citation

de Oliveira Otto, Marcia C., et al. "Dietary Intakes of Zinc and Heme Iron From Red Meat, but Not From Other Sources, Are Associated With Greater Risk of Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 142, no. 3, 2012, pp. 526-33.
de Oliveira Otto MC, Alonso A, Lee DH, et al. Dietary intakes of zinc and heme iron from red meat, but not from other sources, are associated with greater risk of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. J Nutr. 2012;142(3):526-33.
de Oliveira Otto, M. C., Alonso, A., Lee, D. H., Delclos, G. L., Bertoni, A. G., Jiang, R., ... Nettleton, J. A. (2012). Dietary intakes of zinc and heme iron from red meat, but not from other sources, are associated with greater risk of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. The Journal of Nutrition, 142(3), pp. 526-33. doi:10.3945/jn.111.149781.
de Oliveira Otto MC, et al. Dietary Intakes of Zinc and Heme Iron From Red Meat, but Not From Other Sources, Are Associated With Greater Risk of Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease. J Nutr. 2012;142(3):526-33. PubMed PMID: 22259193.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary intakes of zinc and heme iron from red meat, but not from other sources, are associated with greater risk of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. AU - de Oliveira Otto,Marcia C, AU - Alonso,Alvaro, AU - Lee,Duk-Hee, AU - Delclos,George L, AU - Bertoni,Alain G, AU - Jiang,Rui, AU - Lima,Joao A, AU - Symanski,Elaine, AU - Jacobs,David R,Jr AU - Nettleton,Jennifer A, Y1 - 2012/01/18/ PY - 2012/1/20/entrez PY - 2012/1/20/pubmed PY - 2012/4/19/medline SP - 526 EP - 33 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 142 IS - 3 N2 - Metabolic syndrome (MetS), Type 2 diabetes (T2D), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) share an inflammatory etiology and are known to be influenced by diet. We investigated associations of hypothesized prooxidative (Fe) and antioxidative (Zn, Mg, β-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E) micronutrients with incident MetS, T2D, and CVD in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Participants, 45-84 y at baseline (2000-2002), were followed through 2010. Diet was assessed by FFQ. After adjusting for demographics and behavioral confounders, including BMI, dietary vitamin E intake was inversely associated with incident MetS and CVD [HR for extreme quintiles: MetS = 0.78 (95% CI = 0.62, 0.97), P-trend = 0.01; CVD: HR = 0.69 (95% CI = 0.46, 1.03), P-trend = 0.04]. Intakes of heme iron and Zn from red meat, but not from other sources, were positively associated with risk of MetS [heme iron from red meat: HR = 1.25 (95% CI = 0.99,1.56), P-trend = 0.03; Zn from red meat: HR = 1.29 (95% CI = 1.03,1.61), P-trend = 0.04] and CVD [heme iron from red meat: HR = 1.65 (95% CI = 1.10,2.47), P-trend = 0.01; Zn from red meat: HR = 1.51 (95% CI = 1.02, 2.24), P-trend = 0.01]. Dietary intakes of nonheme iron, Mg, vitamin C, and β-carotene were not associated with risk of MetS, T2D, or CVD. Data provided little support for the associations between specific micronutrients and MetS, T2D, or CVD. However, nutrients consumed in red meat, or red meat as a whole, may increase risk of MetS and CVD. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22259193/Dietary_intakes_of_zinc_and_heme_iron_from_red_meat_but_not_from_other_sources_are_associated_with_greater_risk_of_metabolic_syndrome_and_cardiovascular_disease_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.111.149781 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -