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Sex differences in memory of emotional images: a behavioral and electrophysiological investigation.
Int J Psychophysiol. 2012 Jul; 85(1):17-26.IJ

Abstract

Current research suggests that emotional responses differ between men and women. Sex differences regarding emotional effects on memory have been recently studied through brain imaging techniques. However, the majority of investigations have often neglected to balance the variable of emotional intensity (arousal) across pleasant and unpleasant pictures. Additionally, men and women were often mixed or studied separately. The current study aims at comparing men and women's electrophysiological responses related to emotional memory of photographic material. These responses were measured using Event Related brain Potentials (ERP) in response to a task of episodic memory of emotional images. The frontal N200, the parietal P300 and the central LPC were compared in 17 men and 17 women matched for age, social economic status, education and intelligence. Behavioral results showed that, in men, reaction times were modulated by valence, whereas for women, reaction times were mainly modulated by arousal. Accuracy was affected by both emotional valence and arousal, but only in women. ERP analyses revealed that emotional valence influenced earlier time components (frontal N200 and parietal P300), whereas arousal influenced memory in the later time component (central LPC). Moreover, sex differences, mediated by valence and arousal, were found in ERP responses at different times in the processing stream.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22265718

Citation

Glaser, Emma, et al. "Sex Differences in Memory of Emotional Images: a Behavioral and Electrophysiological Investigation." International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, vol. 85, no. 1, 2012, pp. 17-26.
Glaser E, Mendrek A, Germain M, et al. Sex differences in memory of emotional images: a behavioral and electrophysiological investigation. Int J Psychophysiol. 2012;85(1):17-26.
Glaser, E., Mendrek, A., Germain, M., Lakis, N., & Lavoie, M. E. (2012). Sex differences in memory of emotional images: a behavioral and electrophysiological investigation. International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, 85(1), 17-26. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2012.01.007
Glaser E, et al. Sex Differences in Memory of Emotional Images: a Behavioral and Electrophysiological Investigation. Int J Psychophysiol. 2012;85(1):17-26. PubMed PMID: 22265718.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sex differences in memory of emotional images: a behavioral and electrophysiological investigation. AU - Glaser,Emma, AU - Mendrek,Adrianna, AU - Germain,Martine, AU - Lakis,Nadia, AU - Lavoie,Marc E, Y1 - 2012/01/18/ PY - 2011/01/26/received PY - 2011/09/29/revised PY - 2012/01/03/accepted PY - 2012/1/24/entrez PY - 2012/1/24/pubmed PY - 2012/12/10/medline SP - 17 EP - 26 JF - International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology JO - Int J Psychophysiol VL - 85 IS - 1 N2 - Current research suggests that emotional responses differ between men and women. Sex differences regarding emotional effects on memory have been recently studied through brain imaging techniques. However, the majority of investigations have often neglected to balance the variable of emotional intensity (arousal) across pleasant and unpleasant pictures. Additionally, men and women were often mixed or studied separately. The current study aims at comparing men and women's electrophysiological responses related to emotional memory of photographic material. These responses were measured using Event Related brain Potentials (ERP) in response to a task of episodic memory of emotional images. The frontal N200, the parietal P300 and the central LPC were compared in 17 men and 17 women matched for age, social economic status, education and intelligence. Behavioral results showed that, in men, reaction times were modulated by valence, whereas for women, reaction times were mainly modulated by arousal. Accuracy was affected by both emotional valence and arousal, but only in women. ERP analyses revealed that emotional valence influenced earlier time components (frontal N200 and parietal P300), whereas arousal influenced memory in the later time component (central LPC). Moreover, sex differences, mediated by valence and arousal, were found in ERP responses at different times in the processing stream. SN - 1872-7697 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22265718/Sex_differences_in_memory_of_emotional_images:_a_behavioral_and_electrophysiological_investigation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-8760(12)00009-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -