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Effects of ipsapirone and cannabidiol on human experimental anxiety.
J Psychopharmacol. 1993 Jan; 7(1 Suppl):82-8.JP

Abstract

The effects of ipsapirone and cannabidiol (CBD) on healthy volunteers submitted to a simulated public speaking (SPS) test were compared with those of the anxiolytic benzodiazepine diazepam and placebo. Four independent groups of 10 subjects received, under a double-blind design, placebo or one of the following drugs: CBD (300 mg), diazepam (10 mg) or ipsapirone (5 mg). Subjective anxiety was evaluated through the Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) and the State-trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The VAMS anxiety factor showed that ipsapirone attenuated SPS-induced anxiety while CBD decreased anxiety after the SPS test. Diazepam, on the other hand, was anxiolytic before and after the SPS test, but had no effect on the increase in anxiety induced by the speech test. Only ipsapirone attenuated the increase in systolic blood pressure induced by the test. Significant sedative effects were only observed with diazepam. The results suggest that ipsapirone and CBD have anxiolytic properties in human volunteers submitted to a stressful situation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Psychobiology, FFCLRP, Campus USP, Ribeirao Preto, SP 14049, Brazil.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22290374

Citation

Zuardi, A W., et al. "Effects of Ipsapirone and Cannabidiol On Human Experimental Anxiety." Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England), vol. 7, no. 1 Suppl, 1993, pp. 82-8.
Zuardi AW, Cosme RA, Graeff FG, et al. Effects of ipsapirone and cannabidiol on human experimental anxiety. J Psychopharmacol. 1993;7(1 Suppl):82-8.
Zuardi, A. W., Cosme, R. A., Graeff, F. G., & Guimarães, F. S. (1993). Effects of ipsapirone and cannabidiol on human experimental anxiety. Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England), 7(1 Suppl), 82-8. https://doi.org/10.1177/026988119300700112
Zuardi AW, et al. Effects of Ipsapirone and Cannabidiol On Human Experimental Anxiety. J Psychopharmacol. 1993;7(1 Suppl):82-8. PubMed PMID: 22290374.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of ipsapirone and cannabidiol on human experimental anxiety. AU - Zuardi,A W, AU - Cosme,R A, AU - Graeff,F G, AU - Guimarães,F S, PY - 2012/2/1/entrez PY - 1993/1/1/pubmed PY - 1993/1/1/medline SP - 82 EP - 8 JF - Journal of psychopharmacology (Oxford, England) JO - J Psychopharmacol VL - 7 IS - 1 Suppl N2 - The effects of ipsapirone and cannabidiol (CBD) on healthy volunteers submitted to a simulated public speaking (SPS) test were compared with those of the anxiolytic benzodiazepine diazepam and placebo. Four independent groups of 10 subjects received, under a double-blind design, placebo or one of the following drugs: CBD (300 mg), diazepam (10 mg) or ipsapirone (5 mg). Subjective anxiety was evaluated through the Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) and the State-trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The VAMS anxiety factor showed that ipsapirone attenuated SPS-induced anxiety while CBD decreased anxiety after the SPS test. Diazepam, on the other hand, was anxiolytic before and after the SPS test, but had no effect on the increase in anxiety induced by the speech test. Only ipsapirone attenuated the increase in systolic blood pressure induced by the test. Significant sedative effects were only observed with diazepam. The results suggest that ipsapirone and CBD have anxiolytic properties in human volunteers submitted to a stressful situation. SN - 0269-8811 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22290374/Effects_of_ipsapirone_and_cannabidiol_on_human_experimental_anxiety_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/026988119300700112?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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