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Diabetes is the main factor accounting for hypomagnesemia in obese subjects.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and obesity are associated with magnesium deficiency. We aimed to determine whether the presence of type 2 diabetes and the degree of metabolic control are related to low serum magnesium levels in obese individuals.

METHODS

A) Case-control study: 200 obese subjects [50 with T2DM (cases) and 150 without diabetes (controls)] prospectively recruited. B) Interventional study: the effect of bariatric surgery on serum magnesium levels was examined in a subset of 120 obese subjects (40 with type 2 diabetes and 80 without diabetes).

RESULTS

Type 2 diabetic patients showed lower serum magnesium levels [0.75±0.07 vs. 0.81±0.06 mmol/L; mean difference -0.06 (95% CI -0.09 to -0.04); p<0.001] than non-diabetic patients. Forty-eight percent of diabetic subjects, but only 15% of non-diabetic subjects showed a serum magnesium concentration lower than 0.75 mmol/L. Significant negative correlations between magnesium and fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, HOMA-IR, and BMI were detected. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c independently predicted serum magnesium. After bariatric surgery serum magnesium increased only in those patients in whom diabetes was resolved, but remain unchanged in those who not, without difference in loss weight between groups. Changes in serum magnesium negatively correlated with changes in fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c. Absolute changes in HbA1c independently predicted magnesium changes in the multiple linear regression analysis.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results provide evidence that the presence of diabetes and the degree of metabolic control are essential in accounting for the lower levels of magnesium that exist in obese subjects.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

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    CIBER de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabólicas Asociadas, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Diabetes and Metabolism Research Unit, Endocrinology Department, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. alecube@vhebron.net

    , , , ,

    Source

    PloS one 7:1 2012 pg e30599

    MeSH

    Adult
    Bariatric Surgery
    Case-Control Studies
    Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Magnesium
    Magnesium Deficiency
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Obesity
    Risk Factors
    Weight Loss

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22291997

    Citation

    Lecube, Albert, et al. "Diabetes Is the Main Factor Accounting for Hypomagnesemia in Obese Subjects." PloS One, vol. 7, no. 1, 2012, pp. e30599.
    Lecube A, Baena-Fustegueras JA, Fort JM, et al. Diabetes is the main factor accounting for hypomagnesemia in obese subjects. PLoS ONE. 2012;7(1):e30599.
    Lecube, A., Baena-Fustegueras, J. A., Fort, J. M., Pelegrí, D., Hernández, C., & Simó, R. (2012). Diabetes is the main factor accounting for hypomagnesemia in obese subjects. PloS One, 7(1), pp. e30599. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0030599.
    Lecube A, et al. Diabetes Is the Main Factor Accounting for Hypomagnesemia in Obese Subjects. PLoS ONE. 2012;7(1):e30599. PubMed PMID: 22291997.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Diabetes is the main factor accounting for hypomagnesemia in obese subjects. AU - Lecube,Albert, AU - Baena-Fustegueras,Juan Antonio, AU - Fort,José Manuel, AU - Pelegrí,Dolors, AU - Hernández,Cristina, AU - Simó,Rafael, Y1 - 2012/01/24/ PY - 2011/09/24/received PY - 2011/12/22/accepted PY - 2012/2/1/entrez PY - 2012/2/1/pubmed PY - 2012/6/5/medline SP - e30599 EP - e30599 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 7 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and obesity are associated with magnesium deficiency. We aimed to determine whether the presence of type 2 diabetes and the degree of metabolic control are related to low serum magnesium levels in obese individuals. METHODS: A) Case-control study: 200 obese subjects [50 with T2DM (cases) and 150 without diabetes (controls)] prospectively recruited. B) Interventional study: the effect of bariatric surgery on serum magnesium levels was examined in a subset of 120 obese subjects (40 with type 2 diabetes and 80 without diabetes). RESULTS: Type 2 diabetic patients showed lower serum magnesium levels [0.75±0.07 vs. 0.81±0.06 mmol/L; mean difference -0.06 (95% CI -0.09 to -0.04); p<0.001] than non-diabetic patients. Forty-eight percent of diabetic subjects, but only 15% of non-diabetic subjects showed a serum magnesium concentration lower than 0.75 mmol/L. Significant negative correlations between magnesium and fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, HOMA-IR, and BMI were detected. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c independently predicted serum magnesium. After bariatric surgery serum magnesium increased only in those patients in whom diabetes was resolved, but remain unchanged in those who not, without difference in loss weight between groups. Changes in serum magnesium negatively correlated with changes in fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c. Absolute changes in HbA1c independently predicted magnesium changes in the multiple linear regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide evidence that the presence of diabetes and the degree of metabolic control are essential in accounting for the lower levels of magnesium that exist in obese subjects. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22291997/Diabetes_is_the_main_factor_accounting_for_hypomagnesemia_in_obese_subjects_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0030599 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -