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Frailty transitions in the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging.
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Apr; 60(4):652-60.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine frailty transitions in Mexican American (MA) and European American (EA) older adults.

DESIGN

Longitudinal, observational cohort study.

SETTING

Socioeconomically diverse neighborhoods in San Antonio, Texas.

PARTICIPANTS

Three hundred twelve MA and 285 EA community-dwelling older adults (≥ 65) with frailty information at baseline (1992-1996) and transition information at follow-up (2000/01) in the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging.

MEASUREMENTS

Five frailty characteristics (weight loss, exhaustion, weakness, slowness, and low physical activity), frailty score (0-5), and overall frailty state (nonfrail = 0 characteristics, prefrail = 1 or 2, frail = ≥ 3) were assessed at baseline. Transitions (progressed, regressed, or no change) were assessed for frailty score and state. Odds ratios (ORs) of progression and regression in individual characteristics were estimated using generalized estimating equations adjusted for age, sex, ethnic group, socioeconomic status, comorbidity, diabetes, and follow-up interval.

RESULTS

Diabetes mellitus with macrovascular complications (OR = 1.84, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02-3.33), fewer years of education (OR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.93-1.0) and follow-up interval (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.17-1.46) were significant predictors of progression in any frailty characteristic. Mortality increased with greater frailty state, and prefrail individuals were more likely than frail individuals to regress.

CONCLUSION

Diabetes mellitus with macrovascular complications and fewer years of education are important predictors of progression in any frailty characteristic. Because of greater risk of death than for the nonfrail state and greater likelihood of regression than for the frail state, the prefrail state may be an optimal target for intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Gerontology and Palliative Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA. espinozas2@uthscsa.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22316162

Citation

Espinoza, Sara E., et al. "Frailty Transitions in the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 60, no. 4, 2012, pp. 652-60.
Espinoza SE, Jung I, Hazuda H. Frailty transitions in the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012;60(4):652-60.
Espinoza, S. E., Jung, I., & Hazuda, H. (2012). Frailty transitions in the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 60(4), 652-60. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03882.x
Espinoza SE, Jung I, Hazuda H. Frailty Transitions in the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012;60(4):652-60. PubMed PMID: 22316162.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Frailty transitions in the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging. AU - Espinoza,Sara E, AU - Jung,Inkyung, AU - Hazuda,Helen, Y1 - 2012/02/08/ PY - 2012/2/10/entrez PY - 2012/2/10/pubmed PY - 2012/6/20/medline SP - 652 EP - 60 JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JO - J Am Geriatr Soc VL - 60 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine frailty transitions in Mexican American (MA) and European American (EA) older adults. DESIGN: Longitudinal, observational cohort study. SETTING: Socioeconomically diverse neighborhoods in San Antonio, Texas. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred twelve MA and 285 EA community-dwelling older adults (≥ 65) with frailty information at baseline (1992-1996) and transition information at follow-up (2000/01) in the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging. MEASUREMENTS: Five frailty characteristics (weight loss, exhaustion, weakness, slowness, and low physical activity), frailty score (0-5), and overall frailty state (nonfrail = 0 characteristics, prefrail = 1 or 2, frail = ≥ 3) were assessed at baseline. Transitions (progressed, regressed, or no change) were assessed for frailty score and state. Odds ratios (ORs) of progression and regression in individual characteristics were estimated using generalized estimating equations adjusted for age, sex, ethnic group, socioeconomic status, comorbidity, diabetes, and follow-up interval. RESULTS: Diabetes mellitus with macrovascular complications (OR = 1.84, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02-3.33), fewer years of education (OR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.93-1.0) and follow-up interval (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.17-1.46) were significant predictors of progression in any frailty characteristic. Mortality increased with greater frailty state, and prefrail individuals were more likely than frail individuals to regress. CONCLUSION: Diabetes mellitus with macrovascular complications and fewer years of education are important predictors of progression in any frailty characteristic. Because of greater risk of death than for the nonfrail state and greater likelihood of regression than for the frail state, the prefrail state may be an optimal target for intervention. SN - 1532-5415 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22316162/Frailty_transitions_in_the_San_Antonio_Longitudinal_Study_of_Aging_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03882.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -