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Disparities between industrial and surgical ergonomics.
Work. 2012; 41 Suppl 1:4669-72.WORK

Abstract

A surgeon's work environment and working conditions are often harsher than those of an industrial worker. Accepted principles and regulations of ergonomics in manufacturing are largely ignored or absent in the medical/surgical domain. Examples include poor surgical tool handle design, awkward and stressful surgical postures, and prolonged standing without breaks and without a foot mat. In these and other areas, there are documented "best practices" for industrial hygiene and ergonomics that are not yet widely accepted for surgery. There is support in the literature for innovations in surgical ergonomics, yet adoption is not widespread. In the absence of these ergonomic principles, surgical repetitive strain injuries in minimally invasive surgery are reaching epidemic levels. As ergonomists, it falls upon us to understand why current solutions have not been widely adopted within this domain, and to derive solutions to the unique challenges of surgery.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Education, G1211 Towsley Center, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, SPC-5201, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. jseagull@umich.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22317439

Citation

Seagull, F Jacob. "Disparities Between Industrial and Surgical Ergonomics." Work (Reading, Mass.), vol. 41 Suppl 1, 2012, pp. 4669-72.
Seagull FJ. Disparities between industrial and surgical ergonomics. Work. 2012;41 Suppl 1:4669-72.
Seagull, F. J. (2012). Disparities between industrial and surgical ergonomics. Work (Reading, Mass.), 41 Suppl 1, 4669-72. https://doi.org/10.3233/WOR-2012-0107-4669
Seagull FJ. Disparities Between Industrial and Surgical Ergonomics. Work. 2012;41 Suppl 1:4669-72. PubMed PMID: 22317439.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Disparities between industrial and surgical ergonomics. A1 - Seagull,F Jacob, PY - 2012/2/10/entrez PY - 2012/2/10/pubmed PY - 2014/4/10/medline SP - 4669 EP - 72 JF - Work (Reading, Mass.) JO - Work VL - 41 Suppl 1 N2 - A surgeon's work environment and working conditions are often harsher than those of an industrial worker. Accepted principles and regulations of ergonomics in manufacturing are largely ignored or absent in the medical/surgical domain. Examples include poor surgical tool handle design, awkward and stressful surgical postures, and prolonged standing without breaks and without a foot mat. In these and other areas, there are documented "best practices" for industrial hygiene and ergonomics that are not yet widely accepted for surgery. There is support in the literature for innovations in surgical ergonomics, yet adoption is not widespread. In the absence of these ergonomic principles, surgical repetitive strain injuries in minimally invasive surgery are reaching epidemic levels. As ergonomists, it falls upon us to understand why current solutions have not been widely adopted within this domain, and to derive solutions to the unique challenges of surgery. SN - 1875-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22317439/Disparities_between_industrial_and_surgical_ergonomics_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/WOR-2012-0107-4669 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -