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Ocean acidification reduces coral recruitment by disrupting intimate larval-algal settlement interactions.
Ecol Lett. 2012 Apr; 15(4):338-46.EL

Abstract

Ecology Letters (2012) 15: 338-346

ABSTRACT:

Successful recruitment in shallow reef ecosystems often involves specific cues that connect planktonic invertebrate larvae with particular crustose coralline algae (CCA) during settlement. While ocean acidification (OA) can reduce larval settlement and the abundance of CCA, the impact of OA on the interactions between planktonic larvae and their preferred settlement substrate are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CO2 concentrations (800 and 1300 μatm) predicted to occur by the end of this century significantly reduce coral (Acropora millepora) settlement and CCA cover by ≥ 45%. The CCA important for inducing coral settlement (Titanoderma spp., Hydrolithon spp.) were the most deleteriously affected by OA. Surprisingly, the only preferred settlement substrate (Titanoderma) in the experimental controls was avoided by coral larvae as pCO2 increased, and other substrata selected. Our results suggest OA may reduce coral population recovery by reducing coral settlement rates, disrupting larval settlement behaviour, and reducing the availability of the most desirable coralline algal species for successful coral recruitment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia.School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, AustraliaAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, AustraliaGriffith School of Environment and Australian Rivers Institute, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111, AustraliaGlobal Change Institute, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia.School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, AustraliaAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, AustraliaGriffith School of Environment and Australian Rivers Institute, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111, AustraliaGlobal Change Institute, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia.School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, AustraliaAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, AustraliaGriffith School of Environment and Australian Rivers Institute, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111, AustraliaGlobal Change Institute, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia.School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, AustraliaAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, AustraliaGriffith School of Environment and Australian Rivers Institute, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111, AustraliaGlobal Change Institute, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22321314

Citation

Doropoulos, Christopher, et al. "Ocean Acidification Reduces Coral Recruitment By Disrupting Intimate Larval-algal Settlement Interactions." Ecology Letters, vol. 15, no. 4, 2012, pp. 338-46.
Doropoulos C, Ward S, Diaz-Pulido G, et al. Ocean acidification reduces coral recruitment by disrupting intimate larval-algal settlement interactions. Ecol Lett. 2012;15(4):338-46.
Doropoulos, C., Ward, S., Diaz-Pulido, G., Hoegh-Guldberg, O., & Mumby, P. J. (2012). Ocean acidification reduces coral recruitment by disrupting intimate larval-algal settlement interactions. Ecology Letters, 15(4), 338-46. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2012.01743.x
Doropoulos C, et al. Ocean Acidification Reduces Coral Recruitment By Disrupting Intimate Larval-algal Settlement Interactions. Ecol Lett. 2012;15(4):338-46. PubMed PMID: 22321314.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ocean acidification reduces coral recruitment by disrupting intimate larval-algal settlement interactions. AU - Doropoulos,Christopher, AU - Ward,Selina, AU - Diaz-Pulido,Guillermo, AU - Hoegh-Guldberg,Ove, AU - Mumby,Peter J, Y1 - 2012/02/09/ PY - 2012/2/11/entrez PY - 2012/2/11/pubmed PY - 2015/10/13/medline KW - Acropora KW - Hydrolithon KW - Titanoderma KW - coral KW - crustose coralline algae KW - electivity KW - ocean acidification KW - recruitment KW - settlement SP - 338 EP - 46 JF - Ecology letters JO - Ecol Lett VL - 15 IS - 4 N2 - Ecology Letters (2012) 15: 338-346 ABSTRACT: Successful recruitment in shallow reef ecosystems often involves specific cues that connect planktonic invertebrate larvae with particular crustose coralline algae (CCA) during settlement. While ocean acidification (OA) can reduce larval settlement and the abundance of CCA, the impact of OA on the interactions between planktonic larvae and their preferred settlement substrate are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CO2 concentrations (800 and 1300 μatm) predicted to occur by the end of this century significantly reduce coral (Acropora millepora) settlement and CCA cover by ≥ 45%. The CCA important for inducing coral settlement (Titanoderma spp., Hydrolithon spp.) were the most deleteriously affected by OA. Surprisingly, the only preferred settlement substrate (Titanoderma) in the experimental controls was avoided by coral larvae as pCO2 increased, and other substrata selected. Our results suggest OA may reduce coral population recovery by reducing coral settlement rates, disrupting larval settlement behaviour, and reducing the availability of the most desirable coralline algal species for successful coral recruitment. SN - 1461-0248 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22321314/Ocean_acidification_reduces_coral_recruitment_by_disrupting_intimate_larval_algal_settlement_interactions_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2012.01743.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -