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Distress resulting from perceivers' own intimate partner violence experiences predicts culpability attributions toward a battered woman on trial for killing her abuser: a path model.
J Interpers Violence. 2012 Sep; 27(13):2527-44.JI

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) constitutes the majority of assaults against women in the United States, and greater than one third of female homicide victims are murdered by an intimate partner. In a small percentage of cases, battered women kill their abusers, and evidence of battering and its effects may be used to support a plea of self-defense in these cases. Prior research has shown that culpability attributions toward battered women who have killed their abusers are influenced by perceiver variables, including gender. The present study expands on this research by examining the influence of psychological distress resulting from perceivers' own IPV experiences--and the mechanisms of this influence--on their culpability attributions toward a battered woman defendant. Female undergraduates in the present sample (N = 154) read a vignette, adapted from an actual criminal case about a battered woman who had killed her abuser. Data supported a hypothesized path model, wherein participants reporting greater psychological distress resulting from IPV perpetrated against them perceived themselves more similar to the defendant, in turn empathized with her to a greater extent, and, in turn, attributed less legal culpability to her. Implications for future research are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX, USA. mls056@shsu.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22328653

Citation

Stein, Michelle L., and Audrey K. Miller. "Distress Resulting From Perceivers' Own Intimate Partner Violence Experiences Predicts Culpability Attributions Toward a Battered Woman On Trial for Killing Her Abuser: a Path Model." Journal of Interpersonal Violence, vol. 27, no. 13, 2012, pp. 2527-44.
Stein ML, Miller AK. Distress resulting from perceivers' own intimate partner violence experiences predicts culpability attributions toward a battered woman on trial for killing her abuser: a path model. J Interpers Violence. 2012;27(13):2527-44.
Stein, M. L., & Miller, A. K. (2012). Distress resulting from perceivers' own intimate partner violence experiences predicts culpability attributions toward a battered woman on trial for killing her abuser: a path model. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 27(13), 2527-44. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260512436388
Stein ML, Miller AK. Distress Resulting From Perceivers' Own Intimate Partner Violence Experiences Predicts Culpability Attributions Toward a Battered Woman On Trial for Killing Her Abuser: a Path Model. J Interpers Violence. 2012;27(13):2527-44. PubMed PMID: 22328653.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Distress resulting from perceivers' own intimate partner violence experiences predicts culpability attributions toward a battered woman on trial for killing her abuser: a path model. AU - Stein,Michelle L, AU - Miller,Audrey K, Y1 - 2012/02/10/ PY - 2012/2/14/entrez PY - 2012/2/14/pubmed PY - 2012/12/21/medline SP - 2527 EP - 44 JF - Journal of interpersonal violence JO - J Interpers Violence VL - 27 IS - 13 N2 - Intimate partner violence (IPV) constitutes the majority of assaults against women in the United States, and greater than one third of female homicide victims are murdered by an intimate partner. In a small percentage of cases, battered women kill their abusers, and evidence of battering and its effects may be used to support a plea of self-defense in these cases. Prior research has shown that culpability attributions toward battered women who have killed their abusers are influenced by perceiver variables, including gender. The present study expands on this research by examining the influence of psychological distress resulting from perceivers' own IPV experiences--and the mechanisms of this influence--on their culpability attributions toward a battered woman defendant. Female undergraduates in the present sample (N = 154) read a vignette, adapted from an actual criminal case about a battered woman who had killed her abuser. Data supported a hypothesized path model, wherein participants reporting greater psychological distress resulting from IPV perpetrated against them perceived themselves more similar to the defendant, in turn empathized with her to a greater extent, and, in turn, attributed less legal culpability to her. Implications for future research are discussed. SN - 1552-6518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22328653/Distress_resulting_from_perceivers'_own_intimate_partner_violence_experiences_predicts_culpability_attributions_toward_a_battered_woman_on_trial_for_killing_her_abuser:_a_path_model_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0886260512436388?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -