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Effectiveness of group and self-help cognitive behavior therapy in reducing problematic menopausal hot flushes and night sweats (MENOS 2): a randomized controlled trial.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and guided self-help CBT in reducing hot flush and night sweat (HF/NS) problem rating at 6 and 26 weeks after randomization.

METHODS

This was a randomized control trial of 140 women having 10 or more problematic HF/NS a week for at least a month. The primary outcome was HF/NS problem rating (1-10) at 6 weeks after randomization. Secondary outcomes were physiologically measured HF/NS at 6 weeks; HF/NS problem rating at 6 weeks; and frequency, mood (Women's Health Questionnaire), and health-related quality of life (General Health Survey Short Form-36) at 6 and 26 weeks. Intention-to-treat analysis was used, and between-group differences were estimated using linear mixed models.

RESULTS

Baseline mean (SD) HF/NS weekly frequency was 63.15 (49.24), and problem rating was 5.87 (2.28). Group and self-help CBT both significantly reduced HF/NS problem rating at 6 weeks-group CBT versus no treatment control (NTC; adjusted mean difference, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.36-2.88; P < 0.001) and self-help CBT versus NTC (adjusted mean difference, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.29-2.86; P < 0.001)-and at 26 weeks-group CBT versus NTC (adjusted mean difference, 1.33; 95% CI, 0.54-2.13; P = 0.001) and self-help CBT versus NTC (adjusted mean difference, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.36-2.02; P = 0.005). Group and self-help CBT significantly reduced night sweat frequency at 6 and 26 weeks. There were improvements in mood and quality of life at 6 weeks and improved emotional and physical functioning for group CBT at 26 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS

These results suggest that CBT delivered in group or self-help format is an effective treatment option for women during the menopause transition and postmenopause with problematic HF/NS.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Psychology (at Guy's), Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK.

    , , ,

    Source

    Menopause (New York, N.Y.) 19:7 2012 Jul pg 749-59

    MeSH

    Affect
    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
    Female
    Hot Flashes
    Humans
    Hyperhidrosis
    Menopause
    Middle Aged
    Psychotherapy, Group
    Quality of Life
    Self Care
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Treatment Outcome

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22336748

    Citation

    Ayers, Beverley, et al. "Effectiveness of Group and Self-help Cognitive Behavior Therapy in Reducing Problematic Menopausal Hot Flushes and Night Sweats (MENOS 2): a Randomized Controlled Trial." Menopause (New York, N.Y.), vol. 19, no. 7, 2012, pp. 749-59.
    Ayers B, Smith M, Hellier J, et al. Effectiveness of group and self-help cognitive behavior therapy in reducing problematic menopausal hot flushes and night sweats (MENOS 2): a randomized controlled trial. Menopause. 2012;19(7):749-59.
    Ayers, B., Smith, M., Hellier, J., Mann, E., & Hunter, M. S. (2012). Effectiveness of group and self-help cognitive behavior therapy in reducing problematic menopausal hot flushes and night sweats (MENOS 2): a randomized controlled trial. Menopause (New York, N.Y.), 19(7), pp. 749-59. doi:10.1097/gme.0b013e31823fe835.
    Ayers B, et al. Effectiveness of Group and Self-help Cognitive Behavior Therapy in Reducing Problematic Menopausal Hot Flushes and Night Sweats (MENOS 2): a Randomized Controlled Trial. Menopause. 2012;19(7):749-59. PubMed PMID: 22336748.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Effectiveness of group and self-help cognitive behavior therapy in reducing problematic menopausal hot flushes and night sweats (MENOS 2): a randomized controlled trial. AU - Ayers,Beverley, AU - Smith,Melanie, AU - Hellier,Jennifer, AU - Mann,Eleanor, AU - Hunter,Myra S, PY - 2012/2/17/entrez PY - 2012/2/18/pubmed PY - 2012/11/7/medline SP - 749 EP - 59 JF - Menopause (New York, N.Y.) JO - Menopause VL - 19 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and guided self-help CBT in reducing hot flush and night sweat (HF/NS) problem rating at 6 and 26 weeks after randomization. METHODS: This was a randomized control trial of 140 women having 10 or more problematic HF/NS a week for at least a month. The primary outcome was HF/NS problem rating (1-10) at 6 weeks after randomization. Secondary outcomes were physiologically measured HF/NS at 6 weeks; HF/NS problem rating at 6 weeks; and frequency, mood (Women's Health Questionnaire), and health-related quality of life (General Health Survey Short Form-36) at 6 and 26 weeks. Intention-to-treat analysis was used, and between-group differences were estimated using linear mixed models. RESULTS: Baseline mean (SD) HF/NS weekly frequency was 63.15 (49.24), and problem rating was 5.87 (2.28). Group and self-help CBT both significantly reduced HF/NS problem rating at 6 weeks-group CBT versus no treatment control (NTC; adjusted mean difference, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.36-2.88; P < 0.001) and self-help CBT versus NTC (adjusted mean difference, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.29-2.86; P < 0.001)-and at 26 weeks-group CBT versus NTC (adjusted mean difference, 1.33; 95% CI, 0.54-2.13; P = 0.001) and self-help CBT versus NTC (adjusted mean difference, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.36-2.02; P = 0.005). Group and self-help CBT significantly reduced night sweat frequency at 6 and 26 weeks. There were improvements in mood and quality of life at 6 weeks and improved emotional and physical functioning for group CBT at 26 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that CBT delivered in group or self-help format is an effective treatment option for women during the menopause transition and postmenopause with problematic HF/NS. SN - 1530-0374 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22336748/full_citation L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=22336748 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -