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The influence of second intermediate host dispersion pattern upon the transmission of cercariae of Echinoparyphium recurvatum (Digenea: Echinostomatidae).
Parasitology. 1990 Aug; 101 Pt 1:43-7.P

Abstract

Transmission of cercariae of the echinostome digenean Echinoparyphium recurvatum was observed in experimental populations of the second intermediate host snail Lymnaea peregra. Populations of 100 snails were distributed among plastic mesh cages in an infection arena to produce different patterns of host dispersion. Cercarial transmission was investigated in host populations showing three separate patterns of host dispersion; Ideal Regular, Random and Contagious ('Clumped'). Levels of cercarial transmission in populations showing each type of dispersion pattern were found to be significantly different. The highest rate of cercarial transmission occurred in the contagiously dispersed host population, and the lowest in the randomly dispersed population. Analysis of results from the randomly dispersed population also showed that both the mean percentage prevalence of infection, and also the mean number of cysts recovered per snail, increased significantly with the number of snails per cage. The positive relationship between the mean number of cysts per snail and the number of snails per cage was found to be best described by an exponential function. Chemosensory location of L. peregra snail hosts by E. recurvatum cercariae may provide an explanation for the patterns of cercarial transmission observed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Biosphere Sciences, King's College London, University of London, Kensington.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2235073

Citation

McCarthy, A M.. "The Influence of Second Intermediate Host Dispersion Pattern Upon the Transmission of Cercariae of Echinoparyphium Recurvatum (Digenea: Echinostomatidae)." Parasitology, vol. 101 Pt 1, 1990, pp. 43-7.
McCarthy AM. The influence of second intermediate host dispersion pattern upon the transmission of cercariae of Echinoparyphium recurvatum (Digenea: Echinostomatidae). Parasitology. 1990;101 Pt 1:43-7.
McCarthy, A. M. (1990). The influence of second intermediate host dispersion pattern upon the transmission of cercariae of Echinoparyphium recurvatum (Digenea: Echinostomatidae). Parasitology, 101 Pt 1, 43-7.
McCarthy AM. The Influence of Second Intermediate Host Dispersion Pattern Upon the Transmission of Cercariae of Echinoparyphium Recurvatum (Digenea: Echinostomatidae). Parasitology. 1990;101 Pt 1:43-7. PubMed PMID: 2235073.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of second intermediate host dispersion pattern upon the transmission of cercariae of Echinoparyphium recurvatum (Digenea: Echinostomatidae). A1 - McCarthy,A M, PY - 1990/8/1/pubmed PY - 1990/8/1/medline PY - 1990/8/1/entrez SP - 43 EP - 7 JF - Parasitology JO - Parasitology VL - 101 Pt 1 N2 - Transmission of cercariae of the echinostome digenean Echinoparyphium recurvatum was observed in experimental populations of the second intermediate host snail Lymnaea peregra. Populations of 100 snails were distributed among plastic mesh cages in an infection arena to produce different patterns of host dispersion. Cercarial transmission was investigated in host populations showing three separate patterns of host dispersion; Ideal Regular, Random and Contagious ('Clumped'). Levels of cercarial transmission in populations showing each type of dispersion pattern were found to be significantly different. The highest rate of cercarial transmission occurred in the contagiously dispersed host population, and the lowest in the randomly dispersed population. Analysis of results from the randomly dispersed population also showed that both the mean percentage prevalence of infection, and also the mean number of cysts recovered per snail, increased significantly with the number of snails per cage. The positive relationship between the mean number of cysts per snail and the number of snails per cage was found to be best described by an exponential function. Chemosensory location of L. peregra snail hosts by E. recurvatum cercariae may provide an explanation for the patterns of cercarial transmission observed. SN - 0031-1820 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2235073/The_influence_of_second_intermediate_host_dispersion_pattern_upon_the_transmission_of_cercariae_of_Echinoparyphium_recurvatum__Digenea:_Echinostomatidae__ L2 - https://antibodies.cancer.gov/detail/CPTC-SNAI1-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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