Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Balloon dilation laryngoplasty for subglottic stenosis in children: eight years' experience.
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2012; 138(3):235-40AO

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate outcomes of balloon dilation laryngoplasty for laryngeal stenosis in children.

DESIGN

Retrospective study.

SETTING

Academic tertiary care department of pediatric otolaryngology.

PATIENTS

All children treated with laryngeal balloon dilation (primarily or secondarily following laryngeal surgery) from 2002 to 2010.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Stenosis severity, measured using the Cotton and Myer classification.

RESULTS

A total of 44 children ranging in age from 1 month to 10 years (14 [32%] with grade II stenosis, 25 [59%] with grade III stenosis, and 4 [9%] with grade IV stenosis) were included. Twelve children [27%] had congenital laryngeal stenoses, and the in other 32 [7 3%], stenosis was acquired. A total of 52 balloon dilation laryngoplasties were performed, and 37 (71%) were deemed successful. Twenty of the 31 patients undergoing primary dilation (65%) had successful outcomes, and in the other 11 [35%], outcomes were unsuccessful (4 had grade II stenosis and 7 had grade III stenosis) and required either laryngotracheal reconstruction or tracheotomy. Twenty-one balloon dilations were performed as a secondary procedure after recent open surgery; 17 of the procedures (81%) were successful, and thus surgical revision was avoided.

CONCLUSION

Balloon dilation laryngoplasty is an efficient and safe technique for the treatment of both primary and secondary pediatric laryngotracheal stenosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Robert Debré Hospital, APHP, University Paris VII Denis-Diderot, Paris, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22351854

Citation

Hautefort, Charlotte, et al. "Balloon Dilation Laryngoplasty for Subglottic Stenosis in Children: Eight Years' Experience." Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery, vol. 138, no. 3, 2012, pp. 235-40.
Hautefort C, Teissier N, Viala P, et al. Balloon dilation laryngoplasty for subglottic stenosis in children: eight years' experience. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2012;138(3):235-40.
Hautefort, C., Teissier, N., Viala, P., & Van Den Abbeele, T. (2012). Balloon dilation laryngoplasty for subglottic stenosis in children: eight years' experience. Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery, 138(3), pp. 235-40. doi:10.1001/archoto.2011.1439.
Hautefort C, et al. Balloon Dilation Laryngoplasty for Subglottic Stenosis in Children: Eight Years' Experience. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2012;138(3):235-40. PubMed PMID: 22351854.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Balloon dilation laryngoplasty for subglottic stenosis in children: eight years' experience. AU - Hautefort,Charlotte, AU - Teissier,Natacha, AU - Viala,Paul, AU - Van Den Abbeele,Thierry, Y1 - 2012/02/20/ PY - 2012/2/22/entrez PY - 2012/2/22/pubmed PY - 2012/5/5/medline SP - 235 EP - 40 JF - Archives of otolaryngology--head & neck surgery JO - Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg. VL - 138 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate outcomes of balloon dilation laryngoplasty for laryngeal stenosis in children. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Academic tertiary care department of pediatric otolaryngology. PATIENTS: All children treated with laryngeal balloon dilation (primarily or secondarily following laryngeal surgery) from 2002 to 2010. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Stenosis severity, measured using the Cotton and Myer classification. RESULTS: A total of 44 children ranging in age from 1 month to 10 years (14 [32%] with grade II stenosis, 25 [59%] with grade III stenosis, and 4 [9%] with grade IV stenosis) were included. Twelve children [27%] had congenital laryngeal stenoses, and the in other 32 [7 3%], stenosis was acquired. A total of 52 balloon dilation laryngoplasties were performed, and 37 (71%) were deemed successful. Twenty of the 31 patients undergoing primary dilation (65%) had successful outcomes, and in the other 11 [35%], outcomes were unsuccessful (4 had grade II stenosis and 7 had grade III stenosis) and required either laryngotracheal reconstruction or tracheotomy. Twenty-one balloon dilations were performed as a secondary procedure after recent open surgery; 17 of the procedures (81%) were successful, and thus surgical revision was avoided. CONCLUSION: Balloon dilation laryngoplasty is an efficient and safe technique for the treatment of both primary and secondary pediatric laryngotracheal stenosis. SN - 1538-361X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22351854/Balloon_dilation_laryngoplasty_for_subglottic_stenosis_in_children:_eight_years'_experience_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/fullarticle/10.1001/archoto.2011.1439 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -