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The impact of head injury mechanism on mental health symptoms in veterans: do number and type of exposures matter?
J Trauma Stress. 2012 Feb; 25(1):3-9.JT

Abstract

This study examined the association between screening results for mental health problems and the number and type of head injuries in 1,082 Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans who received population-based screening for traumatic brain injury at a Veterans Administration health care facility. Nearly one third of all veterans reported multiple types of head injuries (median = 1 among those with any head injury, range = 1-6 types of head injury). Veterans reporting multiple head injury mechanisms had 6 times the odds of screening positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 6.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) [4.4, 8.7], p < .001, over 4 times the odds of screening positive for depression, adjusted OR = 4.09, 95% CI [2.8, 5.9], p < .001, and about twice the odds of screening positive for alcohol misuse, adjusted OR = 1.64, 95% CI [1.19, 2.3], p = .003, compared to those without head injuries. Veterans reporting a blast plus another head injury mechanism had higher odds of screening positive for all mental health outcomes than any other group (e.g., compared to no head injury group): PTSD, adjusted OR = 6.52, 95% CI [4.6, 9.3], p < .001; depression, adjusted OR = 4.42, 95% CI [3.0, 6.4], p < .001; alcohol misuse, adjusted OR =1.59, 95% CI [1.14, 2.2], p = .006. Given their association with a variety of mental health outcomes, number and type of head injury mechanism should be considered as part of any postdeployment evaluation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, California 94121, USA. Shira.Maguen@va.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22354503

Citation

Maguen, Shira, et al. "The Impact of Head Injury Mechanism On Mental Health Symptoms in Veterans: Do Number and Type of Exposures Matter?" Journal of Traumatic Stress, vol. 25, no. 1, 2012, pp. 3-9.
Maguen S, Madden E, Lau KM, et al. The impact of head injury mechanism on mental health symptoms in veterans: do number and type of exposures matter? J Trauma Stress. 2012;25(1):3-9.
Maguen, S., Madden, E., Lau, K. M., & Seal, K. (2012). The impact of head injury mechanism on mental health symptoms in veterans: do number and type of exposures matter? Journal of Traumatic Stress, 25(1), 3-9. https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.21669
Maguen S, et al. The Impact of Head Injury Mechanism On Mental Health Symptoms in Veterans: Do Number and Type of Exposures Matter. J Trauma Stress. 2012;25(1):3-9. PubMed PMID: 22354503.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The impact of head injury mechanism on mental health symptoms in veterans: do number and type of exposures matter? AU - Maguen,Shira, AU - Madden,Erin, AU - Lau,Karen M, AU - Seal,Karen, PY - 2012/2/23/entrez PY - 2012/2/23/pubmed PY - 2012/6/22/medline SP - 3 EP - 9 JF - Journal of traumatic stress JO - J Trauma Stress VL - 25 IS - 1 N2 - This study examined the association between screening results for mental health problems and the number and type of head injuries in 1,082 Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans who received population-based screening for traumatic brain injury at a Veterans Administration health care facility. Nearly one third of all veterans reported multiple types of head injuries (median = 1 among those with any head injury, range = 1-6 types of head injury). Veterans reporting multiple head injury mechanisms had 6 times the odds of screening positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 6.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) [4.4, 8.7], p < .001, over 4 times the odds of screening positive for depression, adjusted OR = 4.09, 95% CI [2.8, 5.9], p < .001, and about twice the odds of screening positive for alcohol misuse, adjusted OR = 1.64, 95% CI [1.19, 2.3], p = .003, compared to those without head injuries. Veterans reporting a blast plus another head injury mechanism had higher odds of screening positive for all mental health outcomes than any other group (e.g., compared to no head injury group): PTSD, adjusted OR = 6.52, 95% CI [4.6, 9.3], p < .001; depression, adjusted OR = 4.42, 95% CI [3.0, 6.4], p < .001; alcohol misuse, adjusted OR =1.59, 95% CI [1.14, 2.2], p = .006. Given their association with a variety of mental health outcomes, number and type of head injury mechanism should be considered as part of any postdeployment evaluation. SN - 1573-6598 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22354503/The_impact_of_head_injury_mechanism_on_mental_health_symptoms_in_veterans:_do_number_and_type_of_exposures_matter L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.21669 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -