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Increase in fecal primary bile acids and dysbiosis in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multifactorial disease for which a dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been described. Bile acids (BA) could play a role as they are endogenous laxatives and are metabolized by gut microbiota. We compared fecal BA profiles and microbiota in healthy subjects (HS) and patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D), and we searched for an association with symptoms.

METHODS

Clinical features and stool samples were collected in IBS-D patients and HS. Fecal BA profiles were generated using HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The fecal microbiota composition was assessed by q-PCR targeting dominant bacterial groups and species implicated in BA transformation.

KEY RESULTS

Fourteen IBS-D patients and 18 HS were included. The two groups were comparable in terms of age and sex. The percentage of fecal primary BA was significantly higher in IBS-D patients than in HS, and it was significantly correlated with stool consistency and frequency. Fecal counts of all bacteria, lactobacillus, coccoides, leptum and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were similar. There was a significant increase of Escherichia coli and a significant decrease of leptum and bifidobacterium in IBS-D patients.

CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES

We report an increase of primary BA in the feces of IBS-D patients compared to HS, correlated with stool consistency and frequency. A dysbiosis of different bacterial groups was detected, some of them involved in BA transformation. As the gut microbiota is the exclusive pathway to transform primary into secondary BA, this suggests a functional consequence of dysbiosis, leading to lower BA transformation.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Hepato Gastro Enterology Department, Louis Mourier Hospital, University Paris VII, AP-HP, Colombes, France. henri.duboc@gmail.com

    , , , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Bile Acids and Salts
    Colon
    DNA, Bacterial
    Diarrhea
    Feces
    Female
    Humans
    Intestinal Mucosa
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    Male
    Metagenome
    Middle Aged

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22356587

    Citation

    Duboc, H, et al. "Increase in Fecal Primary Bile Acids and Dysbiosis in Patients With Diarrhea-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome." Neurogastroenterology and Motility : the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society, vol. 24, no. 6, 2012, pp. 513-20, e246-7.
    Duboc H, Rainteau D, Rajca S, et al. Increase in fecal primary bile acids and dysbiosis in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2012;24(6):513-20, e246-7.
    Duboc, H., Rainteau, D., Rajca, S., Humbert, L., Farabos, D., Maubert, M., ... Sabaté, J. M. (2012). Increase in fecal primary bile acids and dysbiosis in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Neurogastroenterology and Motility : the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society, 24(6), pp. 513-20, e246-7. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2982.2012.01893.x.
    Duboc H, et al. Increase in Fecal Primary Bile Acids and Dysbiosis in Patients With Diarrhea-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2012;24(6):513-20, e246-7. PubMed PMID: 22356587.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Increase in fecal primary bile acids and dysbiosis in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Duboc,H, AU - Rainteau,D, AU - Rajca,S, AU - Humbert,L, AU - Farabos,D, AU - Maubert,M, AU - Grondin,V, AU - Jouet,P, AU - Bouhassira,D, AU - Seksik,P, AU - Sokol,H, AU - Coffin,B, AU - Sabaté,J M, Y1 - 2012/02/22/ PY - 2012/2/24/entrez PY - 2012/2/24/pubmed PY - 2012/9/22/medline SP - 513-20, e246-7 JF - Neurogastroenterology and motility : the official journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society JO - Neurogastroenterol. Motil. VL - 24 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multifactorial disease for which a dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been described. Bile acids (BA) could play a role as they are endogenous laxatives and are metabolized by gut microbiota. We compared fecal BA profiles and microbiota in healthy subjects (HS) and patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D), and we searched for an association with symptoms. METHODS: Clinical features and stool samples were collected in IBS-D patients and HS. Fecal BA profiles were generated using HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The fecal microbiota composition was assessed by q-PCR targeting dominant bacterial groups and species implicated in BA transformation. KEY RESULTS: Fourteen IBS-D patients and 18 HS were included. The two groups were comparable in terms of age and sex. The percentage of fecal primary BA was significantly higher in IBS-D patients than in HS, and it was significantly correlated with stool consistency and frequency. Fecal counts of all bacteria, lactobacillus, coccoides, leptum and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were similar. There was a significant increase of Escherichia coli and a significant decrease of leptum and bifidobacterium in IBS-D patients. CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: We report an increase of primary BA in the feces of IBS-D patients compared to HS, correlated with stool consistency and frequency. A dysbiosis of different bacterial groups was detected, some of them involved in BA transformation. As the gut microbiota is the exclusive pathway to transform primary into secondary BA, this suggests a functional consequence of dysbiosis, leading to lower BA transformation. SN - 1365-2982 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22356587/Increase_in_fecal_primary_bile_acids_and_dysbiosis_in_patients_with_diarrhea_predominant_irritable_bowel_syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2982.2012.01893.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -