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Increase in fecal primary bile acids and dysbiosis in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.
Neurogastroenterol Motil 2012; 24(6):513-20, e246-7NM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multifactorial disease for which a dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been described. Bile acids (BA) could play a role as they are endogenous laxatives and are metabolized by gut microbiota. We compared fecal BA profiles and microbiota in healthy subjects (HS) and patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D), and we searched for an association with symptoms.

METHODS

Clinical features and stool samples were collected in IBS-D patients and HS. Fecal BA profiles were generated using HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The fecal microbiota composition was assessed by q-PCR targeting dominant bacterial groups and species implicated in BA transformation.

KEY RESULTS

Fourteen IBS-D patients and 18 HS were included. The two groups were comparable in terms of age and sex. The percentage of fecal primary BA was significantly higher in IBS-D patients than in HS, and it was significantly correlated with stool consistency and frequency. Fecal counts of all bacteria, lactobacillus, coccoides, leptum and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were similar. There was a significant increase of Escherichia coli and a significant decrease of leptum and bifidobacterium in IBS-D patients.

CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES

We report an increase of primary BA in the feces of IBS-D patients compared to HS, correlated with stool consistency and frequency. A dysbiosis of different bacterial groups was detected, some of them involved in BA transformation. As the gut microbiota is the exclusive pathway to transform primary into secondary BA, this suggests a functional consequence of dysbiosis, leading to lower BA transformation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hepato Gastro Enterology Department, Louis Mourier Hospital, University Paris VII, AP-HP, Colombes, France. henri.duboc@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22356587

Citation

Duboc, H, et al. "Increase in Fecal Primary Bile Acids and Dysbiosis in Patients With Diarrhea-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome." Neurogastroenterology and Motility : the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society, vol. 24, no. 6, 2012, pp. 513-20, e246-7.
Duboc H, Rainteau D, Rajca S, et al. Increase in fecal primary bile acids and dysbiosis in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2012;24(6):513-20, e246-7.
Duboc, H., Rainteau, D., Rajca, S., Humbert, L., Farabos, D., Maubert, M., ... Sabaté, J. M. (2012). Increase in fecal primary bile acids and dysbiosis in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Neurogastroenterology and Motility : the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society, 24(6), pp. 513-20, e246-7. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2982.2012.01893.x.
Duboc H, et al. Increase in Fecal Primary Bile Acids and Dysbiosis in Patients With Diarrhea-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2012;24(6):513-20, e246-7. PubMed PMID: 22356587.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increase in fecal primary bile acids and dysbiosis in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Duboc,H, AU - Rainteau,D, AU - Rajca,S, AU - Humbert,L, AU - Farabos,D, AU - Maubert,M, AU - Grondin,V, AU - Jouet,P, AU - Bouhassira,D, AU - Seksik,P, AU - Sokol,H, AU - Coffin,B, AU - Sabaté,J M, Y1 - 2012/02/22/ PY - 2012/2/24/entrez PY - 2012/2/24/pubmed PY - 2012/9/22/medline SP - 513-20, e246-7 JF - Neurogastroenterology and motility : the official journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society JO - Neurogastroenterol. Motil. VL - 24 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multifactorial disease for which a dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been described. Bile acids (BA) could play a role as they are endogenous laxatives and are metabolized by gut microbiota. We compared fecal BA profiles and microbiota in healthy subjects (HS) and patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D), and we searched for an association with symptoms. METHODS: Clinical features and stool samples were collected in IBS-D patients and HS. Fecal BA profiles were generated using HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The fecal microbiota composition was assessed by q-PCR targeting dominant bacterial groups and species implicated in BA transformation. KEY RESULTS: Fourteen IBS-D patients and 18 HS were included. The two groups were comparable in terms of age and sex. The percentage of fecal primary BA was significantly higher in IBS-D patients than in HS, and it was significantly correlated with stool consistency and frequency. Fecal counts of all bacteria, lactobacillus, coccoides, leptum and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were similar. There was a significant increase of Escherichia coli and a significant decrease of leptum and bifidobacterium in IBS-D patients. CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: We report an increase of primary BA in the feces of IBS-D patients compared to HS, correlated with stool consistency and frequency. A dysbiosis of different bacterial groups was detected, some of them involved in BA transformation. As the gut microbiota is the exclusive pathway to transform primary into secondary BA, this suggests a functional consequence of dysbiosis, leading to lower BA transformation. SN - 1365-2982 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22356587/Increase_in_fecal_primary_bile_acids_and_dysbiosis_in_patients_with_diarrhea_predominant_irritable_bowel_syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2982.2012.01893.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -