Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Dietary flavonoid intakes and risk of type 2 diabetes in US men and women.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Apr; 95(4):925-33.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Data from mechanistic studies support a beneficial effect of specific flavonoids on insulin sensitivity. However, few studies have evaluated the relation between intakes of different flavonoid subclasses and type 2 diabetes.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to evaluate whether dietary intakes of major flavonoid subclasses (ie, flavonols, flavones, flavanones, flavan-3-ols, and anthocyanins) are associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes in US adults.

DESIGN

We followed up a total of 70,359 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS; 1984-2008), 89,201 women in the NHS II (1991-2007), and 41,334 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-2006) who were free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline.

RESULTS

During 3,645,585 person-years of follow-up, we documented 12,611 incident cases of type 2 diabetes. Higher intakes of anthocyanins were significantly associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes (pooled HR for the 3 cohorts from a comparison of extreme quintiles: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.80, 0.91; P-trend < 0.001) after multivariate adjustment for age, BMI, and lifestyle and dietary factors. Consumption of anthocyanin-rich foods, particularly blueberries (pooled HR: 0.77 from a comparison of ≥2 servings/wk with <1 serving/mo; 95% CI: 0.68, 0.87; P-trend < 0.001) and apples/pears (pooled HR: 0.77 from a comparison of ≥5 servings/wk with <1 serving/mo; 95% CI: 0.65, 0.83; P-trend < 0.001), was also associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. No significant associations were found for total flavonoid intake or other flavonoid subclasses.

CONCLUSION

A higher consumption of anthocyanins and anthocyanin-rich fruit was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. nwedick@hsph.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22357723

Citation

Wedick, Nicole M., et al. "Dietary Flavonoid Intakes and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in US Men and Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 95, no. 4, 2012, pp. 925-33.
Wedick NM, Pan A, Cassidy A, et al. Dietary flavonoid intakes and risk of type 2 diabetes in US men and women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;95(4):925-33.
Wedick, N. M., Pan, A., Cassidy, A., Rimm, E. B., Sampson, L., Rosner, B., Willett, W., Hu, F. B., Sun, Q., & van Dam, R. M. (2012). Dietary flavonoid intakes and risk of type 2 diabetes in US men and women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 95(4), 925-33. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.111.028894
Wedick NM, et al. Dietary Flavonoid Intakes and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in US Men and Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;95(4):925-33. PubMed PMID: 22357723.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary flavonoid intakes and risk of type 2 diabetes in US men and women. AU - Wedick,Nicole M, AU - Pan,An, AU - Cassidy,Aedín, AU - Rimm,Eric B, AU - Sampson,Laura, AU - Rosner,Bernard, AU - Willett,Walter, AU - Hu,Frank B, AU - Sun,Qi, AU - van Dam,Rob M, Y1 - 2012/02/22/ PY - 2012/2/24/entrez PY - 2012/2/24/pubmed PY - 2012/5/9/medline SP - 925 EP - 33 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 95 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Data from mechanistic studies support a beneficial effect of specific flavonoids on insulin sensitivity. However, few studies have evaluated the relation between intakes of different flavonoid subclasses and type 2 diabetes. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to evaluate whether dietary intakes of major flavonoid subclasses (ie, flavonols, flavones, flavanones, flavan-3-ols, and anthocyanins) are associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes in US adults. DESIGN: We followed up a total of 70,359 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS; 1984-2008), 89,201 women in the NHS II (1991-2007), and 41,334 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-2006) who were free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline. RESULTS: During 3,645,585 person-years of follow-up, we documented 12,611 incident cases of type 2 diabetes. Higher intakes of anthocyanins were significantly associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes (pooled HR for the 3 cohorts from a comparison of extreme quintiles: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.80, 0.91; P-trend < 0.001) after multivariate adjustment for age, BMI, and lifestyle and dietary factors. Consumption of anthocyanin-rich foods, particularly blueberries (pooled HR: 0.77 from a comparison of ≥2 servings/wk with <1 serving/mo; 95% CI: 0.68, 0.87; P-trend < 0.001) and apples/pears (pooled HR: 0.77 from a comparison of ≥5 servings/wk with <1 serving/mo; 95% CI: 0.65, 0.83; P-trend < 0.001), was also associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. No significant associations were found for total flavonoid intake or other flavonoid subclasses. CONCLUSION: A higher consumption of anthocyanins and anthocyanin-rich fruit was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22357723/Dietary_flavonoid_intakes_and_risk_of_type_2_diabetes_in_US_men_and_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.111.028894 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -