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Breastfeeding and the use of human milk.

Abstract

Breastfeeding and human milk are the normative standards for infant feeding and nutrition. Given the documented short- and long-term medical and neurodevelopmental advantages of breastfeeding, infant nutrition should be considered a public health issue and not only a lifestyle choice. The American Academy of Pediatrics reaffirms its recommendation of exclusive breastfeeding for about 6 months, followed by continued breastfeeding as complementary foods are introduced, with continuation of breastfeeding for 1 year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant. Medical contraindications to breastfeeding are rare. Infant growth should be monitored with the World Health Organization (WHO) Growth Curve Standards to avoid mislabeling infants as underweight or failing to thrive. Hospital routines to encourage and support the initiation and sustaining of exclusive breastfeeding should be based on the American Academy of Pediatrics-endorsed WHO/UNICEF "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding." National strategies supported by the US Surgeon General's Call to Action, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and The Joint Commission are involved to facilitate breastfeeding practices in US hospitals and communities. Pediatricians play a critical role in their practices and communities as advocates of breastfeeding and thus should be knowledgeable about the health risks of not breastfeeding, the economic benefits to society of breastfeeding, and the techniques for managing and supporting the breastfeeding dyad. The "Business Case for Breastfeeding" details how mothers can maintain lactation in the workplace and the benefits to employers who facilitate this practice.

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    Source

    Pediatrics 129:3 2012 Mar pg e827-41

    MeSH

    Breast Feeding
    Child, Preschool
    Female
    Humans
    Infant
    Infant Nutrition Disorders
    Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
    Infant Welfare
    Infant, Newborn
    Male
    Milk, Human
    Nutritional Requirements
    Pediatrics
    Policy Making
    Practice Guidelines as Topic
    Societies, Medical
    United Nations
    United States
    World Health Organization

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22371471

    Citation

    Section on Breastfeeding. "Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk." Pediatrics, vol. 129, no. 3, 2012, pp. e827-41.
    Section on Breastfeeding. Breastfeeding and the use of human milk. Pediatrics. 2012;129(3):e827-41.
    Section on Breastfeeding. (2012). Breastfeeding and the use of human milk. Pediatrics, 129(3), pp. e827-41. doi:10.1542/peds.2011-3552.
    Section on Breastfeeding. Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk. Pediatrics. 2012;129(3):e827-41. PubMed PMID: 22371471.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Breastfeeding and the use of human milk. A1 - ,, Y1 - 2012/02/27/ PY - 2012/2/29/entrez PY - 2012/3/1/pubmed PY - 2012/4/26/medline SP - e827 EP - 41 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 129 IS - 3 N2 - Breastfeeding and human milk are the normative standards for infant feeding and nutrition. Given the documented short- and long-term medical and neurodevelopmental advantages of breastfeeding, infant nutrition should be considered a public health issue and not only a lifestyle choice. The American Academy of Pediatrics reaffirms its recommendation of exclusive breastfeeding for about 6 months, followed by continued breastfeeding as complementary foods are introduced, with continuation of breastfeeding for 1 year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant. Medical contraindications to breastfeeding are rare. Infant growth should be monitored with the World Health Organization (WHO) Growth Curve Standards to avoid mislabeling infants as underweight or failing to thrive. Hospital routines to encourage and support the initiation and sustaining of exclusive breastfeeding should be based on the American Academy of Pediatrics-endorsed WHO/UNICEF "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding." National strategies supported by the US Surgeon General's Call to Action, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and The Joint Commission are involved to facilitate breastfeeding practices in US hospitals and communities. Pediatricians play a critical role in their practices and communities as advocates of breastfeeding and thus should be knowledgeable about the health risks of not breastfeeding, the economic benefits to society of breastfeeding, and the techniques for managing and supporting the breastfeeding dyad. The "Business Case for Breastfeeding" details how mothers can maintain lactation in the workplace and the benefits to employers who facilitate this practice. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22371471/Breastfeeding_and_the_use_of_human_milk_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=22371471 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -