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Associations of the pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcomes in Taiwanese women.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2012; 21(1):82-7.AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Pre-pregnancy weight and gestational weight gain (GWG) are important factors in both maternal and infant outcomes. Little information is available in relation to different levels of pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and body weight gain on obstetric outcomes in Taiwan. This study investigated the associations between pregnancy complications with pre-pregnant BMI and GWG, in Taiwanese women.

METHODS

Data were extracted from a delivery room information bank on all women delivering singleton babies in a medical center. Eight hundred and sixty pregnant women were included. The collected variables included basic information, GWG, and pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Pregnant women were categorized according to their pre-pregnant BMI and GWG to evaluate the impacts of pre-pregnant BMI and maternal weight gain on the risk of pregnancy complications. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed, and odds ratios were calculated.

RESULTS

Pre-pregnancy BMI>=24 kg/m2 increased the risks of gestational diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, and preterm labor. Preeclampsia and Cesarean delivery were positively associated with high weight gains (>18 kg), whereas a low birth weight and preterm labor were strongly associated with low weight gains (<10 kg). A higher birth weight was found with a GWG of >14 kg in women who were underweight and normal weight before pregnancy.

CONCLUSION

An appropriate maternal BMI (18.5-24 kg/m2) at conception followed by a suitable gestational weight gain (10-14 kg) has substantial impact on the overall health of pregnant women and would lead to better obstetric management for Taiwanese women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan, ROC.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22374564

Citation

Tsai, I-Hsien, et al. "Associations of the Pre-pregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain With Pregnancy Outcomes in Taiwanese Women." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 21, no. 1, 2012, pp. 82-7.
Tsai IH, Chen CP, Sun FJ, et al. Associations of the pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcomes in Taiwanese women. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2012;21(1):82-7.
Tsai, I. H., Chen, C. P., Sun, F. J., Wu, C. H., & Yeh, S. L. (2012). Associations of the pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcomes in Taiwanese women. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 21(1), 82-7.
Tsai IH, et al. Associations of the Pre-pregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain With Pregnancy Outcomes in Taiwanese Women. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2012;21(1):82-7. PubMed PMID: 22374564.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of the pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcomes in Taiwanese women. AU - Tsai,I-Hsien, AU - Chen,Chih-Ping, AU - Sun,Fang-Ju, AU - Wu,Chia-Hsun, AU - Yeh,Sung-Ling, PY - 2012/3/1/entrez PY - 2012/3/1/pubmed PY - 2012/5/2/medline SP - 82 EP - 7 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Pre-pregnancy weight and gestational weight gain (GWG) are important factors in both maternal and infant outcomes. Little information is available in relation to different levels of pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and body weight gain on obstetric outcomes in Taiwan. This study investigated the associations between pregnancy complications with pre-pregnant BMI and GWG, in Taiwanese women. METHODS: Data were extracted from a delivery room information bank on all women delivering singleton babies in a medical center. Eight hundred and sixty pregnant women were included. The collected variables included basic information, GWG, and pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Pregnant women were categorized according to their pre-pregnant BMI and GWG to evaluate the impacts of pre-pregnant BMI and maternal weight gain on the risk of pregnancy complications. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed, and odds ratios were calculated. RESULTS: Pre-pregnancy BMI>=24 kg/m2 increased the risks of gestational diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, and preterm labor. Preeclampsia and Cesarean delivery were positively associated with high weight gains (>18 kg), whereas a low birth weight and preterm labor were strongly associated with low weight gains (<10 kg). A higher birth weight was found with a GWG of >14 kg in women who were underweight and normal weight before pregnancy. CONCLUSION: An appropriate maternal BMI (18.5-24 kg/m2) at conception followed by a suitable gestational weight gain (10-14 kg) has substantial impact on the overall health of pregnant women and would lead to better obstetric management for Taiwanese women. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22374564/Associations_of_the_pre_pregnancy_body_mass_index_and_gestational_weight_gain_with_pregnancy_outcomes_in_Taiwanese_women_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -