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High waste contributes to low food intake in hospitalized patients.
Nutr Clin Pract. 2012 Apr; 27(2):274-80.NC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The prevalence of disease-related malnutrition in hospital inpatients is high; many patients do not meet individual nutrition requirements while hospitalized. To better understand the reasons for inadequate nutrition intake, this study describes patient satisfaction, food provision, food intake, and waste of hospital meals.

METHODS

Over 6 days, 150 hospital meals were weighed and nutrient composition was calculated. On return from the wards, waste was weighed. In addition, nutrition intake was compared to nutrition requirements in 42 patients. In a separate study, the authors studied patient satisfaction with the hospital food service using interviews (n = 112).

RESULTS

The 3 main meals accounted for a mean of 1809 ± 143 kcal and 76 ± 13 g of protein per day. In total, 38% of the food provided by the kitchen was wasted. As a consequence, the main meals supplied an average of 1105 ± 594 kcal and 47 ± 27 g of protein to patients. Sixty-one percent of patients had an energy intake <90% and 75% had a protein intake <90% of requirements. Most patients were satisfied or fairly satisfied with the choices, taste, and presentation of the main meals. Satisfaction with snack meals and information was inadequate.

CONCLUSIONS

The standard meals provided by the hospital kitchen provide adequate amounts of energy and protein. However, most patients do not consume complete meals. It may be concluded that food waste is largely attributed to the inadequate intake of many hospitalized patients. Patients who experienced the worst health status ate the least.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. m.vanbokhorst@vumc.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22378801

Citation

van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, Marian A E., et al. "High Waste Contributes to Low Food Intake in Hospitalized Patients." Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 27, no. 2, 2012, pp. 274-80.
van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren MA, Roosemalen MM, Weijs PJ, et al. High waste contributes to low food intake in hospitalized patients. Nutr Clin Pract. 2012;27(2):274-80.
van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M. A., Roosemalen, M. M., Weijs, P. J., & Langius, J. A. (2012). High waste contributes to low food intake in hospitalized patients. Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 27(2), 274-80. https://doi.org/10.1177/0884533611433602
van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren MA, et al. High Waste Contributes to Low Food Intake in Hospitalized Patients. Nutr Clin Pract. 2012;27(2):274-80. PubMed PMID: 22378801.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High waste contributes to low food intake in hospitalized patients. AU - van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren,Marian A E, AU - Roosemalen,Martin M, AU - Weijs,Peter J M, AU - Langius,Jacqueline A E, Y1 - 2012/02/29/ PY - 2012/3/2/entrez PY - 2012/3/2/pubmed PY - 2012/8/1/medline SP - 274 EP - 80 JF - Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition JO - Nutr Clin Pract VL - 27 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: The prevalence of disease-related malnutrition in hospital inpatients is high; many patients do not meet individual nutrition requirements while hospitalized. To better understand the reasons for inadequate nutrition intake, this study describes patient satisfaction, food provision, food intake, and waste of hospital meals. METHODS: Over 6 days, 150 hospital meals were weighed and nutrient composition was calculated. On return from the wards, waste was weighed. In addition, nutrition intake was compared to nutrition requirements in 42 patients. In a separate study, the authors studied patient satisfaction with the hospital food service using interviews (n = 112). RESULTS: The 3 main meals accounted for a mean of 1809 ± 143 kcal and 76 ± 13 g of protein per day. In total, 38% of the food provided by the kitchen was wasted. As a consequence, the main meals supplied an average of 1105 ± 594 kcal and 47 ± 27 g of protein to patients. Sixty-one percent of patients had an energy intake <90% and 75% had a protein intake <90% of requirements. Most patients were satisfied or fairly satisfied with the choices, taste, and presentation of the main meals. Satisfaction with snack meals and information was inadequate. CONCLUSIONS: The standard meals provided by the hospital kitchen provide adequate amounts of energy and protein. However, most patients do not consume complete meals. It may be concluded that food waste is largely attributed to the inadequate intake of many hospitalized patients. Patients who experienced the worst health status ate the least. SN - 1941-2452 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22378801/High_waste_contributes_to_low_food_intake_in_hospitalized_patients_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1177/0884533611433602 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -