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IgE reactivity patterns in patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis to ragweed and mugwort pollens.
Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2012 Jan-Feb; 26(1):31-5.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Differential diagnosis between ragweed and mugwort pollen allergy represents a large clinical problem in areas where both plants are present. The aim of this study was to investigate ragweed- and mugwort-sensitized patients to identify specific IgE reactivity profiles. Results were correlated to clinical findings such as medical history and health-related quality of life (HRQL).

METHODS

Seventy-four patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis between July and October were examined and underwent in vivo tests (skin-prick test [SPT] and nasal provocation). Sera were evaluated for IgE reactivity to mugwort and ragweed pollen extracts, major (Art v 1; Amb a 1) and minor (profilin and calcium-binding protein) allergens. HRQL was evaluated using a standardized questionnaire.

RESULTS

Seventy-one patients revealed positive SPT reactivity against mugwort and 60 patients against ragweed extracts. Of these patients, 74 revealed IgE antibodies against mugwort extracts, whereas anti-Art v 1 antibodies were detectable in 50 individuals. Fifty-five patients showed IgE antibodies against natural ragweed extracts; anti-Amb v 1 antibodies were detected in six cases only. Using standardized clinical history and HRQL questionnaires we were not able to detect any differences within different reactivity patterns.

CONCLUSION

Within the investigated population of 74 weed-allergic patients the prevalence of true mugwort and ragweed sensitization can be calculated as 68 and 8%. High prevalence of ragweed sensitization when testing with full extracts can be explained by cross-reactivity between other weeds, e.g., mugwort rather than cosensitization. Differences in medical history and HRQL between different reactivity patterns were not detectable.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, Goettingen, Germany. martin.canis@med.uni-goettingen.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22391077

Citation

Canis, Martin, et al. "IgE Reactivity Patterns in Patients With Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis to Ragweed and Mugwort Pollens." American Journal of Rhinology & Allergy, vol. 26, no. 1, 2012, pp. 31-5.
Canis M, Becker S, Gröger M, et al. IgE reactivity patterns in patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis to ragweed and mugwort pollens. Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2012;26(1):31-5.
Canis, M., Becker, S., Gröger, M., & Kramer, M. F. (2012). IgE reactivity patterns in patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis to ragweed and mugwort pollens. American Journal of Rhinology & Allergy, 26(1), 31-5. https://doi.org/10.2500/ajra.2012.26.3698
Canis M, et al. IgE Reactivity Patterns in Patients With Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis to Ragweed and Mugwort Pollens. Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2012 Jan-Feb;26(1):31-5. PubMed PMID: 22391077.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - IgE reactivity patterns in patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis to ragweed and mugwort pollens. AU - Canis,Martin, AU - Becker,Sven, AU - Gröger,Moritz, AU - Kramer,Matthias F, PY - 2012/3/7/entrez PY - 2012/3/7/pubmed PY - 2012/8/4/medline SP - 31 EP - 5 JF - American journal of rhinology & allergy JO - Am J Rhinol Allergy VL - 26 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Differential diagnosis between ragweed and mugwort pollen allergy represents a large clinical problem in areas where both plants are present. The aim of this study was to investigate ragweed- and mugwort-sensitized patients to identify specific IgE reactivity profiles. Results were correlated to clinical findings such as medical history and health-related quality of life (HRQL). METHODS: Seventy-four patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis between July and October were examined and underwent in vivo tests (skin-prick test [SPT] and nasal provocation). Sera were evaluated for IgE reactivity to mugwort and ragweed pollen extracts, major (Art v 1; Amb a 1) and minor (profilin and calcium-binding protein) allergens. HRQL was evaluated using a standardized questionnaire. RESULTS: Seventy-one patients revealed positive SPT reactivity against mugwort and 60 patients against ragweed extracts. Of these patients, 74 revealed IgE antibodies against mugwort extracts, whereas anti-Art v 1 antibodies were detectable in 50 individuals. Fifty-five patients showed IgE antibodies against natural ragweed extracts; anti-Amb v 1 antibodies were detected in six cases only. Using standardized clinical history and HRQL questionnaires we were not able to detect any differences within different reactivity patterns. CONCLUSION: Within the investigated population of 74 weed-allergic patients the prevalence of true mugwort and ragweed sensitization can be calculated as 68 and 8%. High prevalence of ragweed sensitization when testing with full extracts can be explained by cross-reactivity between other weeds, e.g., mugwort rather than cosensitization. Differences in medical history and HRQL between different reactivity patterns were not detectable. SN - 1945-8932 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22391077/IgE_reactivity_patterns_in_patients_with_allergic_rhinoconjunctivitis_to_ragweed_and_mugwort_pollens_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.2500/ajra.2012.26.3698?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -