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Exposure to psychosocial work factors in 31 European countries.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although psychosocial work factors are recognized as major occupational risk factors, little information is available regarding the prevalence of exposure to these factors and the differences in exposure between countries.

AIMS

To explore the differences in various psychosocial work exposures between 31 European countries.

METHODS

The study was based on a sample of 14,881 male and 14,799 female workers from the 2005 European Working Conditions Survey. Eighteen psychosocial work factors were studied: low decision latitude (skill discretion and decision authority), high psychological demands, job strain, low social support, iso-strain, physical violence, sexual harassment, bullying, discrimination, work-family imbalance, long working hours, high effort, job insecurity, low job promotion, low reward and effort-reward imbalance. Covariates were age, number of workers in household, occupation, economic activity, self-employed/employee, public/private sector and part/full time work. Statistical analysis was performed using multilevel logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS

Significant differences in all psychosocial work factors were observed between countries. The rank of the countries varied according to the exposure considered. However, some countries, especially Denmark, Netherlands and Norway, displayed a significantly lower prevalence of exposure to four factors or more, while some Southern and Eastern countries, especially Czech Republic, Greece, Lithuania and Turkey, had a higher prevalence.

CONCLUSIONS

Differences in psychosocial work exposures were found between countries. This study is the first to compare a large set of psychosocial work exposures between 31 European countries. These findings may be useful to guide prevention policies at European level.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    INSERM, U1018, CESP Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Epidemiology of Occupational and Social Determinants of Health Team, Villejuif, France. isabelle.niedhammer@inserm.fr

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Europe
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Mental Disorders
    Middle Aged
    Occupational Diseases
    Occupations
    Risk Factors
    Stress, Psychological
    Workplace
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22394680

    Citation

    Niedhammer, I, et al. "Exposure to Psychosocial Work Factors in 31 European Countries." Occupational Medicine (Oxford, England), vol. 62, no. 3, 2012, pp. 196-202.
    Niedhammer I, Sultan-Taïeb H, Chastang JF, et al. Exposure to psychosocial work factors in 31 European countries. Occup Med (Lond). 2012;62(3):196-202.
    Niedhammer, I., Sultan-Taïeb, H., Chastang, J. F., Vermeylen, G., & Parent-Thirion, A. (2012). Exposure to psychosocial work factors in 31 European countries. Occupational Medicine (Oxford, England), 62(3), pp. 196-202. doi:10.1093/occmed/kqs020.
    Niedhammer I, et al. Exposure to Psychosocial Work Factors in 31 European Countries. Occup Med (Lond). 2012;62(3):196-202. PubMed PMID: 22394680.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Exposure to psychosocial work factors in 31 European countries. AU - Niedhammer,I, AU - Sultan-Taïeb,H, AU - Chastang,J-F, AU - Vermeylen,G, AU - Parent-Thirion,A, Y1 - 2012/03/06/ PY - 2012/3/8/entrez PY - 2012/3/8/pubmed PY - 2012/6/8/medline SP - 196 EP - 202 JF - Occupational medicine (Oxford, England) JO - Occup Med (Lond) VL - 62 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although psychosocial work factors are recognized as major occupational risk factors, little information is available regarding the prevalence of exposure to these factors and the differences in exposure between countries. AIMS: To explore the differences in various psychosocial work exposures between 31 European countries. METHODS: The study was based on a sample of 14,881 male and 14,799 female workers from the 2005 European Working Conditions Survey. Eighteen psychosocial work factors were studied: low decision latitude (skill discretion and decision authority), high psychological demands, job strain, low social support, iso-strain, physical violence, sexual harassment, bullying, discrimination, work-family imbalance, long working hours, high effort, job insecurity, low job promotion, low reward and effort-reward imbalance. Covariates were age, number of workers in household, occupation, economic activity, self-employed/employee, public/private sector and part/full time work. Statistical analysis was performed using multilevel logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Significant differences in all psychosocial work factors were observed between countries. The rank of the countries varied according to the exposure considered. However, some countries, especially Denmark, Netherlands and Norway, displayed a significantly lower prevalence of exposure to four factors or more, while some Southern and Eastern countries, especially Czech Republic, Greece, Lithuania and Turkey, had a higher prevalence. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in psychosocial work exposures were found between countries. This study is the first to compare a large set of psychosocial work exposures between 31 European countries. These findings may be useful to guide prevention policies at European level. SN - 1471-8405 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22394680/Exposure_to_psychosocial_work_factors_in_31_European_countries_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/occmed/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/occmed/kqs020 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -