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Religious involvement and obsessive compulsive disorder among African Americans and Black Caribbeans.
J Anxiety Disord. 2012 May; 26(4):502-10.JA

Abstract

Prior research is equivocal concerning the relationships between religious involvement and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The literature indicates limited evidence of denomination differences in prevalence of OCD whereas findings regarding OCD and degree of religiosity are equivocal. This study builds on prior research by examining OCD in relation to diverse measures of religious involvement within the National Survey of American Life, a nationally representative sample of African American and Black Caribbean adults. Bivariate and multivariate analyses (logistic regression) examine the relationship between lifetime prevalence of OCD and religious denomination, service attendance, non-organizational religiosity (e.g., prayer, religious media) subjective religiosity, and religious coping. Frequent religious service attendance was negatively associated with OCD, whereas Catholic affiliation (as compared to Baptist) and religious coping (prayer when dealing with stressful situations) were both positively associated with OCD. With regard to demographic factors, persons of older age and higher education levels were significantly less likely to have OCD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Social Work, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States. himlej@umich.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22397898

Citation

Himle, Joseph A., et al. "Religious Involvement and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Among African Americans and Black Caribbeans." Journal of Anxiety Disorders, vol. 26, no. 4, 2012, pp. 502-10.
Himle JA, Taylor RJ, Chatters LM. Religious involvement and obsessive compulsive disorder among African Americans and Black Caribbeans. J Anxiety Disord. 2012;26(4):502-10.
Himle, J. A., Taylor, R. J., & Chatters, L. M. (2012). Religious involvement and obsessive compulsive disorder among African Americans and Black Caribbeans. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 26(4), 502-10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2012.02.003
Himle JA, Taylor RJ, Chatters LM. Religious Involvement and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Among African Americans and Black Caribbeans. J Anxiety Disord. 2012;26(4):502-10. PubMed PMID: 22397898.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Religious involvement and obsessive compulsive disorder among African Americans and Black Caribbeans. AU - Himle,Joseph A, AU - Taylor,Robert Joseph, AU - Chatters,Linda M, Y1 - 2012/02/10/ PY - 2012/3/9/entrez PY - 2012/3/9/pubmed PY - 2012/8/17/medline SP - 502 EP - 10 JF - Journal of anxiety disorders JO - J Anxiety Disord VL - 26 IS - 4 N2 - Prior research is equivocal concerning the relationships between religious involvement and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The literature indicates limited evidence of denomination differences in prevalence of OCD whereas findings regarding OCD and degree of religiosity are equivocal. This study builds on prior research by examining OCD in relation to diverse measures of religious involvement within the National Survey of American Life, a nationally representative sample of African American and Black Caribbean adults. Bivariate and multivariate analyses (logistic regression) examine the relationship between lifetime prevalence of OCD and religious denomination, service attendance, non-organizational religiosity (e.g., prayer, religious media) subjective religiosity, and religious coping. Frequent religious service attendance was negatively associated with OCD, whereas Catholic affiliation (as compared to Baptist) and religious coping (prayer when dealing with stressful situations) were both positively associated with OCD. With regard to demographic factors, persons of older age and higher education levels were significantly less likely to have OCD. SN - 1873-7897 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22397898/Religious_involvement_and_obsessive_compulsive_disorder_among_African_Americans_and_Black_Caribbeans_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0887-6185(12)00026-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -