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To accept a pilot? Addressing men's ambivalence and altering their expectancies about therapy.
Psychotherapy (Chic) 2010; 47(3):306-15P

Abstract

When considering the challenges therapists encounter with their male clients, perhaps the most daunting tasks occur at the very beginning. Getting boys and men to avail themselves of psychological services is the first challenge. But when men do present, the second challenge is to get them to trust therapists sufficiently enough to share their issues and to form an effective working alliance. This article describes these gender-related challenges from male clients' point of view, and then elaborates upon effective techniques to help them engage in and benefit from psychotherapy. We suggest that good therapists for men, like good ship pilots, are informed and prepared. They learn the major cognitive and emotional issues they are likely to encounter with their male clients, and develop a variety of ways to help their male clients navigate the tricky psychological issues of their lives.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Educational, School, and Counseling Psychology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65203, USA. goodg@missouri.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22402088

Citation

Good, Glenn E., and John M. Robertson. "To Accept a Pilot? Addressing Men's Ambivalence and Altering Their Expectancies About Therapy." Psychotherapy (Chicago, Ill.), vol. 47, no. 3, 2010, pp. 306-15.
Good GE, Robertson JM. To accept a pilot? Addressing men's ambivalence and altering their expectancies about therapy. Psychotherapy (Chic). 2010;47(3):306-15.
Good, G. E., & Robertson, J. M. (2010). To accept a pilot? Addressing men's ambivalence and altering their expectancies about therapy. Psychotherapy (Chicago, Ill.), 47(3), pp. 306-15. doi:10.1037/a0021162.
Good GE, Robertson JM. To Accept a Pilot? Addressing Men's Ambivalence and Altering Their Expectancies About Therapy. Psychotherapy (Chic). 2010;47(3):306-15. PubMed PMID: 22402088.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - To accept a pilot? Addressing men's ambivalence and altering their expectancies about therapy. AU - Good,Glenn E, AU - Robertson,John M, PY - 2012/3/10/entrez PY - 2010/9/1/pubmed PY - 2012/7/27/medline SP - 306 EP - 15 JF - Psychotherapy (Chicago, Ill.) JO - Psychotherapy (Chic) VL - 47 IS - 3 N2 - When considering the challenges therapists encounter with their male clients, perhaps the most daunting tasks occur at the very beginning. Getting boys and men to avail themselves of psychological services is the first challenge. But when men do present, the second challenge is to get them to trust therapists sufficiently enough to share their issues and to form an effective working alliance. This article describes these gender-related challenges from male clients' point of view, and then elaborates upon effective techniques to help them engage in and benefit from psychotherapy. We suggest that good therapists for men, like good ship pilots, are informed and prepared. They learn the major cognitive and emotional issues they are likely to encounter with their male clients, and develop a variety of ways to help their male clients navigate the tricky psychological issues of their lives. SN - 1939-1536 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22402088/To_accept_a_pilot_Addressing_men's_ambivalence_and_altering_their_expectancies_about_therapy_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/pst/47/3/306 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -