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Leishmaniasis in the United States: treatment in 2012.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2012 Mar; 86(3):434-40.AJ

Abstract

Although civilian physicians in the United States seldom encounter patients with leishmaniasis, therapeutic advances in endemic regions have opened the door to approaches that can be applied in this country. Advances revolve around the use of oral miltefosine in all forms of leishmaniasis and the use of short-course intravenous liposomal amphotericin B in visceral and possibly cutaneous infection. Lengthy, traditional intravenous treatment with pentavalent antimony (sodium stibogluconate) still has a role in the United States; however, although expensive, miltefosine and liposomal amphotericin B are considerably more appealing selections for initial therapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10065, USA. hwmurray@med.cornell.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22403313

Citation

Murray, Henry W.. "Leishmaniasis in the United States: Treatment in 2012." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 86, no. 3, 2012, pp. 434-40.
Murray HW. Leishmaniasis in the United States: treatment in 2012. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2012;86(3):434-40.
Murray, H. W. (2012). Leishmaniasis in the United States: treatment in 2012. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 86(3), 434-40. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.2012.11-0682
Murray HW. Leishmaniasis in the United States: Treatment in 2012. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2012;86(3):434-40. PubMed PMID: 22403313.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Leishmaniasis in the United States: treatment in 2012. A1 - Murray,Henry W, PY - 2012/3/10/entrez PY - 2012/3/10/pubmed PY - 2012/4/24/medline SP - 434 EP - 40 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. VL - 86 IS - 3 N2 - Although civilian physicians in the United States seldom encounter patients with leishmaniasis, therapeutic advances in endemic regions have opened the door to approaches that can be applied in this country. Advances revolve around the use of oral miltefosine in all forms of leishmaniasis and the use of short-course intravenous liposomal amphotericin B in visceral and possibly cutaneous infection. Lengthy, traditional intravenous treatment with pentavalent antimony (sodium stibogluconate) still has a role in the United States; however, although expensive, miltefosine and liposomal amphotericin B are considerably more appealing selections for initial therapy. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22403313/full_citation L2 - http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.2012.11-0682?crawler=true&mimetype=application/pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -