Prime

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The gap in injury mortality rates between urban and rural residents of Hubei Province, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Injury is a growing public health concern in China. Injury death rates are often higher in rural areas than in urban areas in general. The objective of this study is to compare the injury mortality rates in urban and rural residents in Hubei Province in central China by age, sex and mechanism of injury.

METHODS

Using data from the Disease Surveillance Points (DSP) system maintained by the Hubei Province Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from 2006 to 2008, injury deaths were classified according to the International Classification of Disease-10th Revision (ICD-10). Crude and age-adjusted annual mortality rates were calculated for rural and urban residents of Hubei Province.

RESULTS

The crude and age-adjusted injury death rates were significantly higher for rural residents than for urban residents (crude rate ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.8-2.0; adjusted rate ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval 2.3-2.4). The age-adjusted injury death rate for males was 81.6/100,000 in rural areas compared with 37.0/100,000 in urban areas; for females, the respective rates were 57.9/100,000 and 22.4/100,000. Death rates for suicide (32.4 per 100,000 vs 3.9 per 100,000), traffic-related injuries (15.8 per 100,000 vs 9.5 per 100,000), drowning (6.9 per 100,000 vs 2.3 per 100,000) and crushing injuries (2.0 per 100,000 vs 0.7 per 100,000) were significantly higher in rural areas. Overall injury death rates were much higher in persons over 65 years, with significantly higher rates in rural residents compared with urban residents for suicide (279.8 per 100,000 vs 10.7 per 100,000), traffic-related injuries, and drownings in this age group. Death rates for falls, poisoning, and suffocation were similar in the two geographic groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Rates of suicide, traffic-related injury deaths and drownings are demonstrably higher in rural compared with urban locations and should be targeted for injury prevention activity. There is a need for injury prevention policies targeted at elderly residents, especially with regard to suicide prevention in rural areas in Central China.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • FREE Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    The State Key Laboratory of Virology(2004DA105204) and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Wuhan University, 185# Donghu Rd., Wuhan 430071, China.

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    BMC public health 12: 2012 pg 180

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Child
    Child, Preschool
    China
    Drowning
    Female
    Humans
    Infant
    Infant, Newborn
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Rural Population
    Sentinel Surveillance
    Suicide
    Urban Population
    Wounds and Injuries

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22409978

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - The gap in injury mortality rates between urban and rural residents of Hubei Province, China. AU - Liu,Qing, AU - Zhang,Lan, AU - Li,Junlin, AU - Zuo,Dan, AU - Kong,Deguang, AU - Shen,Xingfu, AU - Guo,Yi, AU - Zhang,Qingjun, Y1 - 2012/03/12/ PY - 2011/6/24/received PY - 2012/3/12/accepted PY - 2012/3/12/aheadofprint PY - 2012/3/14/entrez PY - 2012/3/14/pubmed PY - 2012/8/18/medline SP - 180 EP - 180 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Injury is a growing public health concern in China. Injury death rates are often higher in rural areas than in urban areas in general. The objective of this study is to compare the injury mortality rates in urban and rural residents in Hubei Province in central China by age, sex and mechanism of injury. METHODS: Using data from the Disease Surveillance Points (DSP) system maintained by the Hubei Province Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from 2006 to 2008, injury deaths were classified according to the International Classification of Disease-10th Revision (ICD-10). Crude and age-adjusted annual mortality rates were calculated for rural and urban residents of Hubei Province. RESULTS: The crude and age-adjusted injury death rates were significantly higher for rural residents than for urban residents (crude rate ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.8-2.0; adjusted rate ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval 2.3-2.4). The age-adjusted injury death rate for males was 81.6/100,000 in rural areas compared with 37.0/100,000 in urban areas; for females, the respective rates were 57.9/100,000 and 22.4/100,000. Death rates for suicide (32.4 per 100,000 vs 3.9 per 100,000), traffic-related injuries (15.8 per 100,000 vs 9.5 per 100,000), drowning (6.9 per 100,000 vs 2.3 per 100,000) and crushing injuries (2.0 per 100,000 vs 0.7 per 100,000) were significantly higher in rural areas. Overall injury death rates were much higher in persons over 65 years, with significantly higher rates in rural residents compared with urban residents for suicide (279.8 per 100,000 vs 10.7 per 100,000), traffic-related injuries, and drownings in this age group. Death rates for falls, poisoning, and suffocation were similar in the two geographic groups. CONCLUSIONS: Rates of suicide, traffic-related injury deaths and drownings are demonstrably higher in rural compared with urban locations and should be targeted for injury prevention activity. There is a need for injury prevention policies targeted at elderly residents, especially with regard to suicide prevention in rural areas in Central China. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22409978/The_gap_in_injury_mortality_rates_between_urban_and_rural_residents_of_Hubei_Province_China_ L2 - http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/12/180 ER -