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Fatigue, inflammation, and ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acid intake among breast cancer survivors.
J Clin Oncol. 2012 Apr 20; 30(12):1280-7.JC

Abstract

PURPOSE

Evidence suggests that inflammation may drive fatigue in cancer survivors. Research in healthy populations has shown reduced inflammation with higher dietary intake of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which could potentially reduce fatigue. This study investigated fatigue, inflammation, and intake of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFAs among breast cancer survivors.

METHODS

Six hundred thirty-three survivors (mean age, 56 years; stage I to IIIA) participating in the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle Study completed a food frequency/dietary supplement questionnaire and provided a blood sample assayed for C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (30 months after diagnosis) and completed the Piper Fatigue Scale and Short Form-36 (SF-36) vitality scale (39 months after diagnosis). Analysis of covariance and logistic regression models tested relationships between inflammation and fatigue, inflammation and ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA intake, and PUFA intake and fatigue, controlling for three incremental levels of confounders. Fatigue was analyzed continuously (Piper scales) and dichotomously (SF-36 vitality ≤ 50).

RESULTS

Behavioral (P = .003) and sensory (P = .001) fatigue scale scores were higher by increasing CRP tertile; relationships were attenuated after adjustment for medication use and comorbidity. Survivors with high CRP had 1.8 times greater odds of fatigue after full adjustment (P < .05). Higher intake of ω-6 relative to ω-3 PUFAs was associated with greater CRP (P = .01 after full adjustment) and greater odds of fatigue (odds ratio, 2.6 for the highest v lowest intake; P < .05).

CONCLUSION

Results link higher intake of ω-3 PUFAs, decreased inflammation, and decreased physical aspects of fatigue. Future studies should test whether ω-3 supplementation may reduce fatigue among significantly fatigued breast cancer survivors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Office of Cancer Survivorship, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Blvd, Ste 404, Bethesda, MD 20892-8336, USA. alfanoc@mail.nih.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22412148

Citation

Alfano, Catherine M., et al. "Fatigue, Inflammation, and Ω-3 and Ω-6 Fatty Acid Intake Among Breast Cancer Survivors." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, vol. 30, no. 12, 2012, pp. 1280-7.
Alfano CM, Imayama I, Neuhouser ML, et al. Fatigue, inflammation, and ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acid intake among breast cancer survivors. J Clin Oncol. 2012;30(12):1280-7.
Alfano, C. M., Imayama, I., Neuhouser, M. L., Kiecolt-Glaser, J. K., Smith, A. W., Meeske, K., McTiernan, A., Bernstein, L., Baumgartner, K. B., Ulrich, C. M., & Ballard-Barbash, R. (2012). Fatigue, inflammation, and ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acid intake among breast cancer survivors. Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, 30(12), 1280-7. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2011.36.4109
Alfano CM, et al. Fatigue, Inflammation, and Ω-3 and Ω-6 Fatty Acid Intake Among Breast Cancer Survivors. J Clin Oncol. 2012 Apr 20;30(12):1280-7. PubMed PMID: 22412148.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fatigue, inflammation, and ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acid intake among breast cancer survivors. AU - Alfano,Catherine M, AU - Imayama,Ikuyo, AU - Neuhouser,Marian L, AU - Kiecolt-Glaser,Janice K, AU - Smith,Ashley Wilder, AU - Meeske,Kathleen, AU - McTiernan,Anne, AU - Bernstein,Leslie, AU - Baumgartner,Kathy B, AU - Ulrich,Cornelia M, AU - Ballard-Barbash,Rachel, Y1 - 2012/03/12/ PY - 2012/3/14/entrez PY - 2012/3/14/pubmed PY - 2012/6/15/medline SP - 1280 EP - 7 JF - Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology JO - J. Clin. Oncol. VL - 30 IS - 12 N2 - PURPOSE: Evidence suggests that inflammation may drive fatigue in cancer survivors. Research in healthy populations has shown reduced inflammation with higher dietary intake of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which could potentially reduce fatigue. This study investigated fatigue, inflammation, and intake of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFAs among breast cancer survivors. METHODS: Six hundred thirty-three survivors (mean age, 56 years; stage I to IIIA) participating in the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle Study completed a food frequency/dietary supplement questionnaire and provided a blood sample assayed for C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (30 months after diagnosis) and completed the Piper Fatigue Scale and Short Form-36 (SF-36) vitality scale (39 months after diagnosis). Analysis of covariance and logistic regression models tested relationships between inflammation and fatigue, inflammation and ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA intake, and PUFA intake and fatigue, controlling for three incremental levels of confounders. Fatigue was analyzed continuously (Piper scales) and dichotomously (SF-36 vitality ≤ 50). RESULTS: Behavioral (P = .003) and sensory (P = .001) fatigue scale scores were higher by increasing CRP tertile; relationships were attenuated after adjustment for medication use and comorbidity. Survivors with high CRP had 1.8 times greater odds of fatigue after full adjustment (P < .05). Higher intake of ω-6 relative to ω-3 PUFAs was associated with greater CRP (P = .01 after full adjustment) and greater odds of fatigue (odds ratio, 2.6 for the highest v lowest intake; P < .05). CONCLUSION: Results link higher intake of ω-3 PUFAs, decreased inflammation, and decreased physical aspects of fatigue. Future studies should test whether ω-3 supplementation may reduce fatigue among significantly fatigued breast cancer survivors. SN - 1527-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22412148/Fatigue_inflammation_and_ω_3_and_ω_6_fatty_acid_intake_among_breast_cancer_survivors_ L2 - http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.2011.36.4109?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -