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The sound of music: differentiating musicians using a fast, musical multi-feature mismatch negativity paradigm.
Neuropsychologia. 2012 Jun; 50(7):1432-43.N

Abstract

Musicians' skills in auditory processing depend highly on instrument, performance practice, and on level of expertise. Yet, it is not known though whether the style/genre of music might shape auditory processing in the brains of musicians. Here, we aimed at tackling the role of musical style/genre on modulating neural and behavioral responses to changes in musical features. Using a novel, fast and musical sounding multi-feature paradigm, we measured the mismatch negativity (MMN), a pre-attentive brain response, to six types of musical feature change in musicians playing three distinct styles of music (classical, jazz, rock/pop) and in non-musicians. Jazz and classical musicians scored higher in the musical aptitude test than band musicians and non-musicians, especially with regards to tonal abilities. These results were extended by the MMN findings: jazz musicians had larger MMN-amplitude than all other experimental groups across the six different sound features, indicating a greater overall sensitivity to auditory outliers. In particular, we found enhanced processing of pith and sliding up to pitches in jazz musicians only. Furthermore, we observed a more frontal MMN to pitch and location compared to the other deviants in jazz musicians and left lateralization of the MMN to timbre in classical musicians. These findings indicate that the characteristics of the style/genre of music played by musicians influence their perceptual skills and the brain processing of sound features embedded in a musical context. Musicians' brain is hence shaped by the type of training, musical style/genre, and listening experiences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University, Denmark. pv@musikkons.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22414595

Citation

Vuust, Peter, et al. "The Sound of Music: Differentiating Musicians Using a Fast, Musical Multi-feature Mismatch Negativity Paradigm." Neuropsychologia, vol. 50, no. 7, 2012, pp. 1432-43.
Vuust P, Brattico E, Seppänen M, et al. The sound of music: differentiating musicians using a fast, musical multi-feature mismatch negativity paradigm. Neuropsychologia. 2012;50(7):1432-43.
Vuust, P., Brattico, E., Seppänen, M., Näätänen, R., & Tervaniemi, M. (2012). The sound of music: differentiating musicians using a fast, musical multi-feature mismatch negativity paradigm. Neuropsychologia, 50(7), 1432-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2012.02.028
Vuust P, et al. The Sound of Music: Differentiating Musicians Using a Fast, Musical Multi-feature Mismatch Negativity Paradigm. Neuropsychologia. 2012;50(7):1432-43. PubMed PMID: 22414595.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The sound of music: differentiating musicians using a fast, musical multi-feature mismatch negativity paradigm. AU - Vuust,Peter, AU - Brattico,Elvira, AU - Seppänen,Miia, AU - Näätänen,Risto, AU - Tervaniemi,Mari, Y1 - 2012/03/06/ PY - 2011/06/24/received PY - 2012/02/21/revised PY - 2012/02/23/accepted PY - 2012/3/15/entrez PY - 2012/3/15/pubmed PY - 2012/10/20/medline SP - 1432 EP - 43 JF - Neuropsychologia JO - Neuropsychologia VL - 50 IS - 7 N2 - Musicians' skills in auditory processing depend highly on instrument, performance practice, and on level of expertise. Yet, it is not known though whether the style/genre of music might shape auditory processing in the brains of musicians. Here, we aimed at tackling the role of musical style/genre on modulating neural and behavioral responses to changes in musical features. Using a novel, fast and musical sounding multi-feature paradigm, we measured the mismatch negativity (MMN), a pre-attentive brain response, to six types of musical feature change in musicians playing three distinct styles of music (classical, jazz, rock/pop) and in non-musicians. Jazz and classical musicians scored higher in the musical aptitude test than band musicians and non-musicians, especially with regards to tonal abilities. These results were extended by the MMN findings: jazz musicians had larger MMN-amplitude than all other experimental groups across the six different sound features, indicating a greater overall sensitivity to auditory outliers. In particular, we found enhanced processing of pith and sliding up to pitches in jazz musicians only. Furthermore, we observed a more frontal MMN to pitch and location compared to the other deviants in jazz musicians and left lateralization of the MMN to timbre in classical musicians. These findings indicate that the characteristics of the style/genre of music played by musicians influence their perceptual skills and the brain processing of sound features embedded in a musical context. Musicians' brain is hence shaped by the type of training, musical style/genre, and listening experiences. SN - 1873-3514 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22414595/The_sound_of_music:_differentiating_musicians_using_a_fast_musical_multi_feature_mismatch_negativity_paradigm_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0028-3932(12)00098-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -