Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The utility of essential functions in clinical laboratory science programs.
Clin Lab Sci 2011; 24(4 Suppl):4-21-30CL

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Essential functions (EF) define the nonacademic criteria used to determine an individual's qualifications for admission and capabilities of performing in the classroom and laboratory with or without reasonable accommodations. Directors of NAACLS approved and accredited programs were surveyed to investigate their knowledge and perceptions of EF and associations with disabilities and student behaviors.

DESIGN

This was a non-experimental survey consisting of questions related to the use of essential functions (EF) and student behaviors in NAACLS laboratory programs. SurveyMonkey was used to electronically provide the survey of 33 questions to 564 NAACLS programs.

RESULTS

Descriptive statistics were reported as aggregate data with a response rate of 267 (47.3%). EF are utilized in 95.5% of the programs; however, only 38.6% of the participants responded that EF are required by both the ADA and NAACLS. A student had never been dismissed based on EF in 80.0% of the programs. Many programs have been successful in mentoring students with disabilities to successful completion. Hearing impairment was the most reported disability (30.0%). Participants felt most comfortable referring students for academic coaching (96.2%) when compared to medical concerns (86.5%), and psychological concerns (82.7%).

CONCLUSIONS

While most programs utilized EF, many program directors were not aware that EF are required by both NAACLS and the ADA. Programs have successfully instructed and graduated students with a variety of disabilities and generally feel comfortable in referring students for assistance. Concerns with inappropriate behaviors present unique, generational challenges to faculty.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Youngstown State University, Department of Health Professions, OH 44555, USA. medelost@ysu.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22420227

Citation

Delost, Maria E., and Teresa S. Nadder. "The Utility of Essential Functions in Clinical Laboratory Science Programs." Clinical Laboratory Science : Journal of the American Society for Medical Technology, vol. 24, no. 4 Suppl, 2011, pp. 4-21-30.
Delost ME, Nadder TS. The utility of essential functions in clinical laboratory science programs. Clin Lab Sci. 2011;24(4 Suppl):4-21-30.
Delost, M. E., & Nadder, T. S. (2011). The utility of essential functions in clinical laboratory science programs. Clinical Laboratory Science : Journal of the American Society for Medical Technology, 24(4 Suppl), pp. 4-21-30.
Delost ME, Nadder TS. The Utility of Essential Functions in Clinical Laboratory Science Programs. Clin Lab Sci. 2011;24(4 Suppl):4-21-30. PubMed PMID: 22420227.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The utility of essential functions in clinical laboratory science programs. AU - Delost,Maria E, AU - Nadder,Teresa S, PY - 2012/3/17/entrez PY - 2012/3/17/pubmed PY - 2012/4/4/medline SP - 4-21-30 JF - Clinical laboratory science : journal of the American Society for Medical Technology JO - Clin Lab Sci VL - 24 IS - 4 Suppl N2 - OBJECTIVE: Essential functions (EF) define the nonacademic criteria used to determine an individual's qualifications for admission and capabilities of performing in the classroom and laboratory with or without reasonable accommodations. Directors of NAACLS approved and accredited programs were surveyed to investigate their knowledge and perceptions of EF and associations with disabilities and student behaviors. DESIGN: This was a non-experimental survey consisting of questions related to the use of essential functions (EF) and student behaviors in NAACLS laboratory programs. SurveyMonkey was used to electronically provide the survey of 33 questions to 564 NAACLS programs. RESULTS: Descriptive statistics were reported as aggregate data with a response rate of 267 (47.3%). EF are utilized in 95.5% of the programs; however, only 38.6% of the participants responded that EF are required by both the ADA and NAACLS. A student had never been dismissed based on EF in 80.0% of the programs. Many programs have been successful in mentoring students with disabilities to successful completion. Hearing impairment was the most reported disability (30.0%). Participants felt most comfortable referring students for academic coaching (96.2%) when compared to medical concerns (86.5%), and psychological concerns (82.7%). CONCLUSIONS: While most programs utilized EF, many program directors were not aware that EF are required by both NAACLS and the ADA. Programs have successfully instructed and graduated students with a variety of disabilities and generally feel comfortable in referring students for assistance. Concerns with inappropriate behaviors present unique, generational challenges to faculty. SN - 0894-959X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22420227/The_utility_of_essential_functions_in_clinical_laboratory_science_programs_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/disabilities.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -