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Family caregiver participation in hospice interdisciplinary team meetings: how does it affect the nature and content of communication?
Health Commun 2013; 28(2):110-8HC

Abstract

Collaboration between family caregivers and health care providers is necessary to ensure patient-centered care, especially for hospice patients. During hospice care, interdisciplinary team members meet biweekly to collaborate and develop holistic care plans that address the physical, spiritual, psychological, and social needs of patients and families. The purpose of this study was to explore team communication when video-conferencing is used to facilitate the family caregiver's participation in a hospice team meeting. Video-recorded team meetings with and without family caregiver participation were analyzed for communication patterns using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Standard meetings that did not include caregivers were shorter in duration and task-focused, with little participation from social workers and chaplains. Meetings that included caregivers revealed an emphasis on biomedical education and relationship-building between participants, little psychosocial counseling, and increased socioemotional talk from social workers and chaplains. Implications for family participation in hospice team meetings are highlighted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Markey Cancer Center and Department of Communication, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0509, USA. Elaine.lyles@uky.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22435889

Citation

Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine, et al. "Family Caregiver Participation in Hospice Interdisciplinary Team Meetings: How Does It Affect the Nature and Content of Communication?" Health Communication, vol. 28, no. 2, 2013, pp. 110-8.
Wittenberg-Lyles E, Oliver DP, Kruse RL, et al. Family caregiver participation in hospice interdisciplinary team meetings: how does it affect the nature and content of communication? Health Commun. 2013;28(2):110-8.
Wittenberg-Lyles, E., Oliver, D. P., Kruse, R. L., Demiris, G., Gage, L. A., & Wagner, K. (2013). Family caregiver participation in hospice interdisciplinary team meetings: how does it affect the nature and content of communication? Health Communication, 28(2), pp. 110-8. doi:10.1080/10410236.2011.652935.
Wittenberg-Lyles E, et al. Family Caregiver Participation in Hospice Interdisciplinary Team Meetings: How Does It Affect the Nature and Content of Communication. Health Commun. 2013;28(2):110-8. PubMed PMID: 22435889.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Family caregiver participation in hospice interdisciplinary team meetings: how does it affect the nature and content of communication? AU - Wittenberg-Lyles,Elaine, AU - Oliver,Debra Parker, AU - Kruse,Robin L, AU - Demiris,George, AU - Gage,L Ashley, AU - Wagner,Ken, Y1 - 2012/03/21/ PY - 2012/3/23/entrez PY - 2012/3/23/pubmed PY - 2013/12/16/medline SP - 110 EP - 8 JF - Health communication JO - Health Commun VL - 28 IS - 2 N2 - Collaboration between family caregivers and health care providers is necessary to ensure patient-centered care, especially for hospice patients. During hospice care, interdisciplinary team members meet biweekly to collaborate and develop holistic care plans that address the physical, spiritual, psychological, and social needs of patients and families. The purpose of this study was to explore team communication when video-conferencing is used to facilitate the family caregiver's participation in a hospice team meeting. Video-recorded team meetings with and without family caregiver participation were analyzed for communication patterns using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Standard meetings that did not include caregivers were shorter in duration and task-focused, with little participation from social workers and chaplains. Meetings that included caregivers revealed an emphasis on biomedical education and relationship-building between participants, little psychosocial counseling, and increased socioemotional talk from social workers and chaplains. Implications for family participation in hospice team meetings are highlighted. SN - 1532-7027 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22435889/Family_caregiver_participation_in_hospice_interdisciplinary_team_meetings:_how_does_it_affect_the_nature_and_content_of_communication L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10410236.2011.652935 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -