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Friendship context matters: examining the domain specificity of alcohol and depression socialization among adolescents.
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2012 Oct; 40(7):1027-43.JA

Abstract

Driven by existing socialization theories, this study describes specific friendship contexts in which peer influence of alcohol misuse and depressive symptoms occurs. In the fall and spring of the school year, surveys were administered to 704 Italian adolescents (53 % male, M (age) = 15.53) enrolled in Grades 9, 10 and 11. Different friendship contexts were distinguished based on two dimensions referring to the level (i.e., best friendships and friendship networks) and reciprocity (i.e., unilateral and reciprocal) of the relationships. Social network and dyadic analyses were applied in a complementary manner to estimate peer socialization effects across the different friendship contexts. Results showed that within friendship networks both male and female adolescents' alcohol misuse was affected by friends' alcohol misuse, regardless of whether the relationship was reciprocated or not. Conversely, peer socialization of depressive symptoms only emerged within very best friendship dyads of female adolescents. Findings suggest that the effects of peer socialization depend on the friendship context and specific types of behaviors. The theoretical and methodological implications of the findings are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Torino, via Verdi 10, 10124, Torino, Italy. M.Giletta@pwo.ru.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22441645

Citation

Giletta, Matteo, et al. "Friendship Context Matters: Examining the Domain Specificity of Alcohol and Depression Socialization Among Adolescents." Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, vol. 40, no. 7, 2012, pp. 1027-43.
Giletta M, Scholte RH, Prinstein MJ, et al. Friendship context matters: examining the domain specificity of alcohol and depression socialization among adolescents. J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2012;40(7):1027-43.
Giletta, M., Scholte, R. H., Prinstein, M. J., Engels, R. C., Rabaglietti, E., & Burk, W. J. (2012). Friendship context matters: examining the domain specificity of alcohol and depression socialization among adolescents. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 40(7), 1027-43. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-012-9625-8
Giletta M, et al. Friendship Context Matters: Examining the Domain Specificity of Alcohol and Depression Socialization Among Adolescents. J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2012;40(7):1027-43. PubMed PMID: 22441645.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Friendship context matters: examining the domain specificity of alcohol and depression socialization among adolescents. AU - Giletta,Matteo, AU - Scholte,Ron H J, AU - Prinstein,Mitchell J, AU - Engels,Rutger C M E, AU - Rabaglietti,Emanuela, AU - Burk,William J, PY - 2012/3/24/entrez PY - 2012/3/24/pubmed PY - 2012/12/22/medline SP - 1027 EP - 43 JF - Journal of abnormal child psychology JO - J Abnorm Child Psychol VL - 40 IS - 7 N2 - Driven by existing socialization theories, this study describes specific friendship contexts in which peer influence of alcohol misuse and depressive symptoms occurs. In the fall and spring of the school year, surveys were administered to 704 Italian adolescents (53 % male, M (age) = 15.53) enrolled in Grades 9, 10 and 11. Different friendship contexts were distinguished based on two dimensions referring to the level (i.e., best friendships and friendship networks) and reciprocity (i.e., unilateral and reciprocal) of the relationships. Social network and dyadic analyses were applied in a complementary manner to estimate peer socialization effects across the different friendship contexts. Results showed that within friendship networks both male and female adolescents' alcohol misuse was affected by friends' alcohol misuse, regardless of whether the relationship was reciprocated or not. Conversely, peer socialization of depressive symptoms only emerged within very best friendship dyads of female adolescents. Findings suggest that the effects of peer socialization depend on the friendship context and specific types of behaviors. The theoretical and methodological implications of the findings are discussed. SN - 1573-2835 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22441645/Friendship_context_matters:_examining_the_domain_specificity_of_alcohol_and_depression_socialization_among_adolescents_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-012-9625-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -